Watch EW's exclusive preview of Pushing the Line, which features the latest craze: traipsing over canyons on a wire.

By Lynette Rice
June 04, 2021 at 01:13 PM EDT
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Apparently, there aren't enough challenges in the world for some people.

On Saturday, Discovery+ will debut a new unscripted series called Pushing the Line, which features thrill seekers who think the best way to traverse a canyon is to go over it on a wire. And EW has the first, anxiety-inducing look.

These people are called highliners, who live together and "push each other to take on the craziest places to set lines and break records," according to Discovery+. Ability to balance on a thin wire is a must; acrophobics need not apply.

PUSHING THE LINE
Credit: Renan Ozturk/Discovery+

Here's the official Logline for the series: "Few people will experience highlining themselves. It requires you to be strong physically with incredible athleticism, balance, stamina to walk a long line. But you also must be strong mentally — even just to attempt getting on the line. This all-new series takes viewers inside the world of these fearless athletes, who live every day like it could be their last. What answers are they searching for out on that line? This is an intimate look at what motivates these athletes to risk it all every day."

To make Pushing the Line, 495 Productions spent 30 days following some of the world's best highliners, including Andy Lewis, who helped invent the sport and appeared with Madonna at the Super Bowl. Mia Noblet is also featured. She holds the world record for longest walk (for women and men). Destinations on the show include Moab's iconic Fruit Bowl (where a line is strung 500-feet above the desert floor) and the Colorado Rockies. Anything higher should be featured in the next Mission: Impossible movie.

The series is available to stream Saturday, June 5, on Discovery+. Watch EW's preview above.

Check out our daily must-see picks — plus news, celeb interviews, trivia, and more — in EW's What to Watch podcast, hosted by Gerrad Hall. 

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