Twelve obstacle courses based on the '80s arcade game. One cash prize.

By Nick Romano
February 23, 2021 at 03:49 PM EST
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There's been a trend lately with video games being developed into TV shows: The Last of Us, Assassin's Creed, Halo, Fallout, etc. And now the latest to join that roster in the era of prestige TV is… not what we were expecting.

Frogger, the classic arcade game that launched in the 1980s, is now becoming a TV show. It's not going to be a dark and brooding drama about a tortured amphibian forced to flee his home due to deforestation and pollution and make a treacherous journey across traffic to reach a new settlement for his children, nor will it become an animated kids comedy series starring a fun-loving frog who's constantly avoiding those pesky cars and gators hell-bent on putting a stop to his hop. No, Frogger will become "a larger-than-life physical competition series" at Peacock, consisting of 13 hourlong episodes, NBC announced Tuesday.

Eureka Productions in partnership with Konami Cross Media NY Inc. will create 12 obstacle courses, dubbed "crossings," based on elements from the Konami video game. "These physically demanding challenges will see contestants dodge treacherous traffic, leap over snapping gators, and hop over hungry hippos to conquer the course," according to a press release. This will all be done for what is only described as "a huge cash prize."

Credit: Nintendo

After the childhood game Floor Is Lava became a reality competition show some of us actually enjoyed, perhaps it's not the craziest concept ever dreamt up. What other kid obsessions deserve the reality competition treatment? Giant-size Cat's Cradle where you have to traverse an obstacle course of entwined string? Death-defying hopscotch where hopping to the wrong marker will trigger a trap door that sends you plunging into a pool of water below?

A website for casting submissions for Frogger has already been set up for prospective contestants. The show will be filmed in Australia. So hop to it!

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