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Entertainment Weekly

Theater

Drawn together: Carol Channing and Al Hirschfeld

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© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Carol Channing in Hello, Dolly!, 1964

Legendary artist Al Hirschfeld had the uncanny ability to perfectly capture the essence of a character or performer with his elegant black-and-white portraits. This is especially true of his many works featuring Carol Channing, the beloved icon of American theater who died on Jan. 15 at the age of 97. During his amazing 75-year working relationship with The New York Times, Al drew Carol over 30 times, for all her many Broadway triumphs and flops, and her numerous Hello, Dolly! revivals. His lovingly expressive caricatures show her full range, expressive eyes, and giant mouth better than any photo could. Here is a fun gallery — courtesy of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation — celebrating one of the greatest artist-and-muse relationships of all time. EASTER EGG ALERT: See if you can find all the hidden NINAs in the portraits. Following the birth of his daughter Nina in 1945, Hirschfeld started hiding her name within his drawings. The number following his signature is the amount of NINAs in the picture. Good luck!
© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Carol Channing in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1950

© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Unlikely Casting: Carol Channing as Lady Macbeth, 1964

© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Carol Channing in Show Girl, 1961

© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Carol Channing in Lorelei, 1974

© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Famous Feud: Carol Channing and Marlene Dietrich, 1963

© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Carol Channing, television special singing "If I Were a Rich Man," 1968

© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

George Burns and Carol Channing, 1976

© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Carol Channing in Hello, Dolly!, 1978

© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Two Famous Dollys: Pearl Bailey and Carol Channing, 1969

© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Carol Channing in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1973

© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Carol Channing, 1969

© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. http://www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

By Golly, It’s Dolly Again: Collage of Carol Channing in Hello, Dolly!, 1995

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