"It's a lot of pain, a lot of worry," Lynne Spears told Ronan Farrow and Jia Tolentino for a recently published The New Yorker piece.

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Lynne Spears is speaking out about daughter Britney amid her conservatorship woes.

In a new report from The New Yorker published Saturday, Lynne, 66, told reporters Ronan Farrow and Jia Tolentino in June that she had concerns about her daughter's current situation, in which she is under a conservatorship co-managed by her father Jamie and others.

According to the report, Lynne "spoke in a whisper" as "she declined to answer detailed questions about the case." The mother of three also apologized, stating that should another family member walk in and find her on a call with a reporter, she would potentially have to "hang up abruptly."

"I got mixed feelings about everything," Lynne detailed to Farrow, 33, and Tolentino, 32. "I don't know what to think ... It's a lot of pain, a lot of worry."

"I'm good. I'm good at deflecting," she added "wryly," per the publication.

britney and lynne spears
Britney Spears and mom Lynne
| Credit: Jeff Kravitz/Filmmagic

As Britney, 39, fights for more freedom and an eventual end to her conservatorship, sources tell PEOPLE in this week's cover story that Lynne will be in her corner.

While Lynne has been largely uninvolved in her daughter's conservatorship over the years — which has been in place since 2008 — she recently decided to take a more hands-on approach after "Britney begged her for help," a Spears family source says.

At a public court hearing last November, Lynne supported Britney's request to remove her father Jamie, whom Lynne divorced in 2002, as a conservator. Through a lawyer, she told the judge that the father-daughter duo had a "toxic" relationship.

"Lynne feels there are a lot of concerns with the conservatorship," says the family source. "She feels Jamie has not been transparent with her and is helping Britney as much as she can."

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As Britney gave an impassioned 23 minutes of testimony during a conservatorship hearing in Los Angeles court on June 23, Lynne and her lawyer listened in. The speech marked the first time Britney has spoken publicly about her conservatorship, under which Jamie and others have held the power to make her personal and financial decisions when her erratic behavior culminated in two involuntary 5150 holds in a psychiatric hospital.

During her speech, Britney rapidly made startling allegations against her conservators, family, and management team, including that they denied her the right to have more children by not letting her remove her IUD, forced her to work a grueling schedule she likened to "sex trafficking," and put her on the psychiatric drug lithium (which is commonly used to treat mood disorders, including bipolar disorder) against her wishes.

"My dad and anyone involved in this conservatorship and my management who played a huge role in punishing me — they should be in jail," said Britney, whose longtime court-appointed lawyer Sam Ingham prefaced his client's speech by informing the judge he had "not attempted" to "filter" Britney's words.

During the hearing, the star was not questioned by her conservators' lawyers, and they have not yet had a chance to respond to her allegations in court.

RELATED VIDEO: Britney Spears Breaks Silence After Conservatorship Hearing: 'I Apologize for Pretending Like I've Been OK'

In The New Yorker piece, Farrow and Tolentino also reported that Britney called the police the night ahead of her hearing before the court, which the outlet said they confirmed through Ventura County law enforcement and a close friend.

According to the publication, Britney called 911 to report herself as a victim of abuse in her conservatorship.

PEOPLE can confirm that the Ventura County Sheriff's Department was called the day before Britney's hearing. Police records show officials arrived at her home per her "request."

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This story originally appeared on people.com

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