By Maureen Lee Lenker
March 19, 2018 at 03:06 PM EDT

It appears that actor Jim Carrey is using art to send a message.

The comedian shared his latest painting via social media on Sunday, and it strongly resembled White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. “This is the portrait of a so-called Christian whose only purpose in life is to lie for the wicked. Monstrous!” he captioned the image.

A spokeswoman for the actor confirmed to the Associated Press that the painting was made by Carrey, but she would not confirm whether it was a representation of Sanders.

On Monday, Carrey appeared to double down on his criticism of the Trump administration via his artwork with another social media post. “If you liked my last cartoon you may also enjoy… THE WICKED WITCH OF THE WEST WING AND PUTIN’S FLYING MONKEYS,” he wrote alongside an image that appeared to be Donald Trump dressed as the Wicked Witch of the West from The Wizard of Oz.

The images sparked controversy with many on Twitter saying that Carrey was “bullying” Sanders and decrying the image’s seeming mockery of Sanders’ physical appearance. “And this is one more reason that I’m done with Hollywood. It’s ok to be mean and hurtful as long as it’s to someone you disagree with, right? Btw, this is a classic example of bullying. But again, it’s ok as long as it’s someone you disagree with, right?” wrote one Twitter user.

“If you were a conservative ‘actor’ (I use that word extremely loosely now) and she was liberal you would be driven out of Hollywood and labeled as the most sexist monster to ever walk the earth,” wrote another.

However, many also took to Twitter to praise Carrey’s work, saying it was a “good likeness” of Sanders. Others pointed out that the arguments against the artwork could be seen as hypocritical. “I’d bet my bank account that if Jim Carrey had made a portrait of Hillary Clinton instead of Sarah Sanders, the Trumpers would be loving it. It would be their new Twitter avatar,” tweeted one user.

Carrey previously discussed his love of painting in a documentary short called I Needed Color, explaining how the art form helped him to heal during difficult times in his life.

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