The bonus track many got with physical copies of Folklore is now available to stream and download.

By Nick Romano
August 18, 2020 at 12:21 PM EDT
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Credit: Beth Garrabrant
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Just when you thought you didn't have any tears left to cry for Taylor Swift's Folklore, the pop star goes ahead by dropping  "The Lakes" on streaming and downloadable platforms.

The song presented itself as a bonus track for those who purchased physical copies of Folklore, which released in July. On Tuesday, a couple weeks later, Swift announced it went wide.

The 30-year-old singer embraces romantic poetry in this piece, which many of her Swifties are convinced is about boyfriend Joe Alwyn.

"Take me to the lakes, where all the poets went to die/ I don't belong and, my beloved, neither do you," Swift sings. "Those Windermere peaks look like a perfect place to cry/ I'm setting off, but not without my muse." The "muse," people presume, could be Alwyn. Then there's also the reference later on to "a red rose" that "grew up out of ice frozen ground." In "Call It What You Want," Swift previously used floral imagery with "all my flowers grew back as thorns" but "he built a fire just to keep me warm." Some food for thought, if you will.

"The Lakes" also appears to reference her on-going battle with producer Scooter Braun, who owns her masters and prompted Swift's plan to rerecord her past catalogue. She sings, "What should be over burrowed under my skin/ In heart-stopping waves of hurt/ I've come too far to watch some namedropping sleaze/ Tell me what are my words worth."

As Folklore became the best-selling album of 2020 by August, Swift spoke out once again against President Donald Trump and urged her fans to vote early in the 2020 presidential election.

"Trump’s calculated dismantling of [the U.S. Postal Service] proves one thing clearly: He is WELL AWARE that we do not want him as our president," she tweeted this weekend. "He’s chosen to blatantly cheat and put millions of Americans’ lives at risk in an effort to hold on to power."

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Folklore

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