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Taylor Swift has something new to be thankful for.

The singer-songwriter just made major Billboard history with her 10-minute, 13-second version of "All Too Well," which was released Nov. 12 as part of Red (Taylor's Version). According to the outlet, the song can now be considered the longest No. 1 hit in Hot 100 chart history. Don McLean's "American Pie (Parts I & II)," which has a runtime of 8 minutes and 37 seconds, previously held the record for just short of 50 years. (It had its first of four weeks at No. 1 in January 1972.)

Billboard combined the stats for the new release of the original "All Too Well" and the extended version, but because the extended version accounted for a larger percentage of the combined songs' activity (62% of streams and 78% of sales), it takes this new record.

Swift thanked the fans for the milestone on Monday. "I'm so proud of this song and the memories I have with you guys because of it. You truly chose this one and now you did THIS?! I'm floored. A ten minute song is at the top of the Hot 100," she tweeted.

The original 2012 version of "All Too Well" (not to be confused with the "Taylor's Version" that just dropped) became a fan favorite upon its release, and is widely considered to be one of Swift's best songs. She has long said the breakup anthem started out as a 10-minute song and had to be cut down, but the longer version hadn't seen the light of day until now.

Taylor Swift Red
The album cover for 'Red (Taylor's Version),' by Taylor Swift
| Credit: Republic

With Red (Taylor's Version) — which debuted at No. 1 in the U.S. with total consumption reaching 605,000 units, and more than 1.2 million globally — Swift becomes the first artist ever to simultaneously debut atop the Billboard 200 and Billboard Hot 100 for a third time. It's also her 10th No. 1 album, making her just the second woman to achieve at least 10 No. 1s, following Barbra Streisand, who has 11.

Red (Taylor's Version) is the second of her older albums to be re-recorded and released as part of Swift's efforts to reclaim the masters to all her work.

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