Warner Bros. and AMC will re-release Chadwick Boseman's Jackie Robinson biopic to theaters after the Black Panther star's death.

By Joey Nolfi
September 01, 2020 at 02:02 PM EDT
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  • Movie

One of Chadwick Boseman's most celebrated roles is returning to theaters in the wake of the actor's death.

Four days after the Black Panther performer died at age 43 following a four-year battle with colon cancer, Warner Bros. and AMC have partnered to theatrically re-release the late performer's star-making turn as legendary baseball player Jackie Robinson in Brian Helgeland's biopic 42.

EW has learned the decision to show the film in 300 AMC locations beginning Thursday was made in celebration of Boseman's life, with 42 chosen as an appropriate representation of his career excellence after gauging guest feedback about their favorite performances from his filmography (not including Black Panther, which already screened at AMC throughout the last week). The film will be in 740 total locations around the country, also including theaters operated by Regal, Cinemark, Marcus, Alamo Drafthouse, Harkins, Galaxy, and other independent owners.

Though the coronavirus pandemic has forced nationwide theater closures, AMC locations have slowly begun reopening, and the chain's new Safe & Clean initiative will be enforced via automatic seat blocking in reserved-seating auditoriums and mandatory mask-wearing for all guests and employees. Fans who aren't up for traveling to a movie theater amid the pandemic can rent or buy the film on Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, or Vudu.

Initially released in 2013, 42 — which also stars Harrison Ford, Nicole Beharie, Christopher Meloni, and André Holland — went on to gross nearly $100 million at the global box office before scoring three nominations at the NAACP Image Awards.

Tickets to see 42 back in theaters will cost $5, and will be on sale as of Tuesday evening. Check your local theater page for details and ticket purchases.

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42

type
  • Movie
mpaa
  • PG-13
runtime
  • 128 minutes
director
  • Brian Helgeland

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