By Derek Lawrence
February 28, 2020 at 01:34 PM EST
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Universal Pictures; Take Five/Hulu; Everett Collection

The Invisible Man (2020 movie)

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Elisabeth Moss is screaming and running for her life. You’re watching The Handmaid’s Tale. Oh wait, no, it’s Us. Scratch that, I meant The Invisible Man.

It’s hard to keep track, because Hollywood just loves terrorizing Moss. The release of the scary-as-hell Invisible Man is just the latest in a string of disturbing situations that the Emmy winner has been put in. For three seasons and counting, she’s been mentally and physically abused on The Handmaid’s Tale. Then last year, she was killed by her evil doppelgänger in Us (not even N.W.A. could save her). And now with The Invisible Man, she’s being haunted by what she believes is her abusive ex, who, after seemingly committing suicide, is, you guessed it, invisible (and you thought your ex was tough to shake!).

And those are just the recent harrowing ordeals. Going back to her recurring run on The West Wing, Moss’ First Daughter Zoey Bartlett was kidnapped. They couldn’t just let her go to Lollapalooza and smoke some weed?! Of course not, because it’s Moss. The actress has also been on two different Law & Order series, playing two different characters who I assume were similarly terrorized victims. And I have not yet seen her well-received Sundance drama Shirley, but my colleague David Canfield’s review headline tells me all I need to know: “Elisabeth Moss goes gloriously demented in Shirley.”

She’s truly a master at losing her s— and letting out a terrifying cry. Just look at the way she’s dragged in this pic. You can’t teach that!

Mark Rogers/Universal

But I’m here to plead with Hollywood (and Ms. Moss) to let her have some fun! She got to show flashes before her aforementioned death in Us, but we need more. Someone get me the Elisabeth Moss rom-com she’s deserved since flashing great chemistry with Jonah Hill in 2010’s criminally underrated Get Him to the Greek! (No offense to Hill, but I’m dreaming of a Moss-Brian Tyree Henry pairing in our future.)

Speaking of Moss’ past projects, we have seven seasons of proof that Moss can do a lot more than just be scared (that’s what the Mad Men is for!). It wasn’t always smooth sailing for Peggy Olson (it was the ’60s after all), but Moss often shined most when she got to show off her character’s spunk and sense of humor. I have high hopes that we’ll be seeing more of that in her next few films, which include Wes Anderson’s The French Dispatch and Taika Waititi’s Next Goal Wins.

In closing, I ask once again that we stop making this charming badass seem like the invisible woman:

The Invisible Man is in theaters now.

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The Invisible Man (2020 movie)

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