By Joey Nolfi
March 10, 2017 at 04:06 PM EST
Warner Bros. Pictures/Everett Collection; IFC Films

Kong: Skull Island squares off against Logan for the top spot at the box office this weekend, but, in the days ahead, plenty of critically-acclaimed titles including Personal Shopper and Raw deserve your attention on the limited front. With so many new and holdover titles to choose from, EW wants you to make good choices at the movies, so consult our Critical Mass reviews guide below before heading to the multiplex this weekend.

Kong: Skull Island

Opens March 10 in theaters nationwide.

EW’s Chris Nashawaty says:

As for subtlety, there isn’t a whole lot of that either. The team starts dropping bombs and wreaking havoc on the island, letting you know that the real monster is man himself. Meanwhile, Reilly and the mighty Kong are left to save the picture. And mostly, they succeed. Or, at least, well enough. Kong swats the military helicopters out of the sky like a giant swatting pesky flies. Jackson barks his great vengeance and furious anger. Hiddleston smolders and briefly wields a samurai sword. Larson takes surprisingly few pictures for a photographer, but she does get her Fay Wray moment. And Reilly delivers sorely needed punchlines between exposition about Kong and the island’s backstory. The rest are, more or less, just bodies lining up for the body count—although some of the kills are surprisingly clever and not worth spoiling. Meanwhile, Kong does his thing and does it well. The poor misunderstood guy seems destined to keep proving to humankind that he comes in peace. I kept waiting for a single tear to streak down his big hairy cheekB-

Read the full review here.

Rotten Tomatoes: 79%

Metacritic: 63

Personal Shopper

Opens March 10 in limited release.

EW’s Leah Greenblatt says:

Here, Stewart once again plays a young American adrift in Europe, and still toiling in the fame-industrial complex — not as a catchall assistant to a famous actress this time, but in the slightly more elevated post of personal shopper. By day Maureen rides her scooter through the narrow streets of Paris, picking up sequined Chanel sheaths and Cartier jewels for her employer, a spoiled, little-seen starlet. But her mind is consumed with the recent death of her twin brother; he believed he was a medium, and that she shares the same sensitivities. There are plenty of signs that she does: Ghostly figures appear; glasses shatter; foreboding texts materialize on her iPhone. Stewart, who appears in nearly every scene, is intensely watchable, a coiled spring. But the movie is too fragmented and tonally strange to register as more than one of Maureen’s wispy, haunted apparitions. B

Read the full review here.

Rotten Tomatoes: 77%

Metacritic: 77

Raw

Opens March 10 in limited release.

EW’s Chris Nashawaty says:

Fresh from the international festival circuit, Raw is unsettling and repulsive and, believe it or not, occasionally funny. It’s got audacity and style, and it packs an undeniably wicked punch. But Ducournau, in her feature-film debut, never quite figures out what to do with the provocatively gory metaphor she sets up. Instead, she just pours on more ketchup. I can’t believe I’m saying this, but I wish there were a little more meat to chew on. B

Read the full review here.

Rotten Tomatoes: 91%

Metacritic: 82

My Scientology Movie

Opens March 10 in limited release.

EW’s Joe McGovern says:

[BBC broadcaster Louis Theroux’s] low-key approach yields honest moments of insight about the complexities of confronting another person’s faith. His conclusions about the power of doctrine are, ironically, transcendent. And for its imagination and open-mindedness, My Scientology Movie is one of the best documentaries of the year. A

Read the full review here.

Rotten Tomatoes: 88%

Metacritic: 64

Brimstone

Opens March 10 in limited release.

EW’s Darren Franich says:

Director Martin Koolhoven made a name for himself with 2008’s Winter in Wartime, an acclaimed war film made in his native Netherlands. Clearly this new film took him a long time, and it badly wants to be an epic of sinful corrosion on the edge of the American Dream. Themes of incest and sexual assault run through the movie, but Brimstone is a bit of a goof, really. Wildly melodramatic moments of operatic violence are shot with flat-gritty modernism: It’s like someone thought A Fistful of Dollars could be Unforgiven. By the time Game of Thrones‘ Kit Harington shows up as the world’s cutest sad cowboy, the pastiche is completeC

Read the full review here.

Rotten Tomatoes: 32%

Metacritic: 44

Logan

Now playing.

EW’s Chris Nashawaty says:

Logan is essentially a road movie, but it’s a dark one (and a very long one). More than ever, Jackman’s Logan seems like he’s at an existential dead-end, and he’s never exactly been a barrel of laughs to begin with. Mangold shoots the film in a grungy, south-of-the-border Peckinpah palette. There isn’t a lot of hope in the movie. The stakes aren’t grandiose, no one’s saving the world. They’re saving this one special — and very, very violent child (although there will turn out to be others like her). Since Laura’s mutant physical gifts are so identical to Logan’s, there’s a melancholy to their relationship. She’s the daughter he never slowed down enough to allow himself to have. The loner has to learn to put someone else first. It’s both as manipulative and hokey as that sounds, but occasionally it works well enough that you might find yourself getting choked up against your better judgment. B-

Read the full review here.

Rotten Tomatoes: 92%

Metacritic: 77

Get Out

Now playing.

EW’s Chris Nashawaty says:

The first half of the film builds with expertly cranked white-knuckle tension. And Chris’ (Daniel Kaluuya) periodic phone calls to his hilariously skeptical black friend at home (LilRel Howery) are like a merry-prankster Greek chorus commenting on the whole get-the-hell-out-of-the-houseness of Chris’ situation. But Get Out’s delicate balancing act gets wobbly in the second half of the film when Peele’s conceptually daring premise unspools with a fairly clichéd genre climax. For a film that’s asking hard questions, it takes the easy way out. Still, Peele is undeniably a born filmmaker with big ambitions and an even bigger set of balls. He’s made a horror movie whose biggest jolts have nothing to do with blood or bodies, but rather with big ideasB

Read the full review here.

Rotten Tomatoes: 99%

Metacritic: 83

The Shack

Now playing.

EW’s Chris Nashawaty says:

It’s hard to argue with spiritual movies that are as well-intentioned as The Shack is. There are a few moments that are genuinely touching and heartwarming enough to put a lump in even the most reluctant moviegoer’s throat. But there’s also something about the film that leaves a sour aftertaste. Its answers are offered up too easy. They’re too spoon-fed and trite. It makes light of the grueling process of grieving for a loved one. Just have faith, the movie says, and you too will be at peace. All that’s missing in the film’s bucolic spiritual way-station is a cornfield. Don’t worry, though, there’s more than enough corn elsewhere in the movie. ­–

Read the full review here.

Rotten Tomatoes: 18%

Metacritic: 32

The LEGO Batman Movie

Now playing.

EW’s Chris Nashawaty says:

Seventy-five percent of the film’s carpet-­bomb campaign of pop culture meta punchlines will ricochet over the target audience’s head, but parents dragged along for the ride will no doubt be grateful for Arnett’s rat-a-tat send-ups of Adam West and superhero clichés. Directed by Robot Chicken’s Chris McKay and produced in part by the first film’s dynamic duo Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, LEGO Batman revs so fast and moves so frenetically that 
it becomes a little exhausting by the end. It flirts with being too much of a good thing. But rarely has corporate brainwashing been so much fun and gone down with such a delightful aftertaste. B+

Read the full review here.

Rotten Tomatoes: 91%

Metacritic: 75

John Wick: Chapter 2

Now playing.

EW’s Chris Nashawaty says:

Keanu Reeves is like a haunted (and largely speechless) ronin living by the 21st-century code of the samurai. If that all sounds too highfalutin by half, well, there’s also a bunch of tire-squealing car chases, countless point-blank kills, and scenic bone-crunching brawls in Rome’s ancient catacombs. And there’s a laundry list of interesting character actors who keep dropping by to spice up the bloodbath, like Laurence Fishburne, Common, and Ian McShane, who purrs bespoke menace as the grandmaster of the whole masonic order. But it’s Reeves, with his natty suits and icy stare, who grabs you by the throat — figuratively and literally. Killing is John Wick’s business…and business is good. B+

Read the full review here.

Rotten Tomatoes: 90%

Metacritic: 75

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