We now have the first official details on the follow-up to Assassin's Creed Odyssey.

By Nick Romano
April 29, 2020 at 04:26 PM EDT
Advertisement
Ubisoft

After journeying across ancient Greece, the Assassin's Creed franchise will next take players to the land of Vikings in Assassin's Creed Valhalla.

Artist Kode Abdo, known better as Boss Logic, has designed movie posters for Marvel and DC, and on Wednesday morning, during an eight-hour Twitch livestream from gaming publisher Ubisoft, he revealed what he has "been working on for the past few months": first-look teaser art for the new game.

Rumors about the Norse setting have swirled in the past few months, but it was confirmed when the livestream showed Abdo crafting the imagery from start to finish. The first trailer for Valhalla will arrive Thursday.

The popular action-adventure series has taken gamers to various corners of the globe and of history, notably Victorian London in Assassin's Creed Syndicate, ancient Egypt in Assassin's Creed Origins, and 16th-century China in Assassin's Creed Chronicles. The franchise's premise centers on the Order of Assassins and their fight against the Knights Templar by using Animus technology to inhabit the memories of figures from the past, though recent games have seen a departure from this.

Assassin's Creed Odyssey dropped in October 2018 with the return of Layla Hassan, a character from Origins. In the modern day, she uncovered ancient artifacts that allowed her to inhabit the memories of a Greek mercenary. As Kassandra or Alexios, depending on which gender the player chose to take on, it was the player's mission to traverse ancient Greece to reunite their long-lost family, unlock the secrets of an ancient civilization, and stop a mysterious cult from altering the course of history.

DLCs with the Legacy of the First Blade and The Fate of Atlantis were subsequently launched to continue the Odyssey story. The developers also introduced dialogue options that allowed the character to pursue romantic encounters, same-sex or otherwise, which wasn't without controversy.

Related content:

Comments