By Derek Lawrence
June 25, 2021 at 06:00 AM EDT
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John Cena knows what you're thinking. "I don't know how many comments are going to be, 'You're talking to no one, there's just a chair and green screen,' and I welcome them all," jokes the wrestler-turned-actor at the top of the latest installment of EW's BINGE: The Fast Saga, alluding to his famous "You Can't See Me" catchphrase from his reign in the WWE. "I bring the power of invisibility to Fast."

It's been a long road from king of wrestling to newest member of the Fast & Furious family for Cena, who debuts in F9 as Jakob Toretto, the previously unmentioned superspy brother of Dom (Vin Diesel) and Mia (Jordana Brewster). It was just over a decade ago when Cena told himself that he was done making movies, having felt more like a cog in WWE's attempt to break into Hollywood than an actual actor. After a few years away, he returned as a comedy scene-stealer as opposed to action hero, earning laughs in Trainwreck, Sisters, and Blockers. Back during a 2018 interview about Blockers, which features a chase scene that ends with a crash and Fast joke, this reporter suggested the next logical step was Cena joining the mega-franchise. "That stuff is beyond my control, but I would absolutely love that opportunity," he told EW. "That, for me, would be a dream."

Fast-forward three years and F9's year-plus delay due to a global pandemic, and Cena is not just starring in a Fast movie, but he's a Toretto. "This is all surreal," he admits to BINGE hosts Derek Lawrence and Chanelle Berlin Johnson. "It's a dream come true, and it's such a life-changing opportunity. I've never had anything like this, to be invited into a legacy body of work that is already successful and the world already anticipates. I really put my heart and soul into this, and I'm very proud of what's going to show up onscreen. The cast and crew that have spent 20 years forging this legacy, and I don't take that lightly; the invite has weight and tremendous perspective. I really hope everyone sees the movie and thinks my contribution did justice to the legacy that is Fast."

F9, Fast 9
Credit: Giles Keyte/Universal Pictures

It was the idea of introducing Jakob and finally exploring family directly through bloodlines that re-energized five-time Fast director Justin Lin and brought him back to the franchise that he walked away from after 2013's Fast & Furious 6.

"I had the excitement of saying, 'Oh, great, we get to explore this new Toretto,' and then, yeah, the next thought was just pure hundred percent fear," says Lin with a laugh. "John was the first meeting that I had. We were just getting to know each other, and like 30 seconds in, I'm like, 'Okay, good, I can breathe.' Right away, he understood the character, and it was just a part of him that I felt I hadn't seen. I thought it was going to be way tougher, but he made it very, very easy. He left, and I called Vin and said, 'You got to meet with him.' And I think Vin was working out or something, and he saw him, and right there I get a call, and I'm like, 'Wait, that's it?! We're good?' Sometimes you just get lucky."

Cena, a Fast superfan who counts The Fast and the Furious and Tokyo Drift as his personal faves, knew the pressure was on him, between the expectations of the Toretto name and Diesel crediting the late Paul Walker for "sending" Cena to him. But he did have a few things going for him in portraying the F9 antagonist.

"As someone who's trying to hone my skills as an actor, I'm still still very much a rookie," says Cena, who believes studying under the likes of Diesel and Lin "made me better." "This movie is a success without me - Fast is going to be Fast. It's not going to be, nor does it need to be, the John Cena show. That really allows me to contribute to Fast the best I can, and to take chances and be bold, and be the best Jakob Toretto that I possibly can be. I really looked at this opportunity [as] not trying to change the world, because the world isn't broken - I'm trying to add to it."

It's going to be a busy summer for Cena fans, with the now very in-demand actor starring in James Gunn's superhero sequel The Suicide Squad (Aug. 6 in theaters and on HBO Max), Hulu's raunchy comedy Vacation Friends (Aug. 27), and F9 (out now), which Hollywood hopes can rev up the pandemic-deflated box office. "I couldn't think of a better vehicle, absolute pun intended, to get people to come together," he says. "It delivers everything you'd want in a night at the movies, and symbolizes what going to the movies is all about."

While Lin and Diesel are already hard at work planning out the final two installments of the main Fast series, Cena refuses to look ahead to a possible Fast future, preferring to bask in living out his dream until he gets the feedback that really matters.

"Jakob's future is uncertain, and that's completely up to the audience," admits Cena. "The one thing that Fast does extremely well is listen to their fans. I think 'justice for Han' is a great example of that. It would be such a waste of time and energy, planting expectations that could ultimately just be letdown. I just want to enjoy the now, and for me the now is, I've had to wait patiently, as we all have. F9 is finally coming out in theaters, and this thing finally is real, and if Jakob Toretto is F9 and that's it, still what an awesome thing to be able to grab the wheel of an automobile in Fast & Furious."

To listen, subscribe to EW's BINGE: The Fast Saga feed via Apple PodcastsSpotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. You can also subscribe to EW's YouTube page to catch all the video interviews, and stay tuned to EW.com for even more Fast coverage, including our upcoming special spoiler-filled F9 episode with Justin Lin, Sung Kang, Jordana Brewster, and Helen Mirren.

FULL EPISODE TRANSCRIPT

John Cena:

I was scheduled to meet Vin for a conversation, and I met him. He has a gym that is dedicated to Fast that he uses to motivate himself to kind of prepare to be Dom. We just started talking about life and our values and perspectives, and that morphed more into conversations about the movies. And we're just talking like two human beings, but inside. One, it's the first time I've ever met Vin Diesel, so this is crazy. Two, I'm kind of also talking to Dom Toretto and like, "What the F is going on?" And then afterwards he's... Not afterwards. During, he kind of puts on his phone and kind of welcomes me into the family, but doesn't, and I just don't know what's going on. Literally remember seeing the cross for the first time. I'm like, "What going on?" It's otherworldly. I couldn't imagine.

Derek Lawrence:

Ask any podcaster, any real podcaster, it doesn't matter if you record in-person or over video chat, podcasting is podcasting. Welcome back to EW's BINGE of The Fast Saga. Full transcripts of which are available on ew.com. I'm Derek Lawrence a.k.a the guy who went as Dominic Toretto for two straight Halloweens. As that icon once said, "The most important thing in life will always be the people in this Zoom, right here, right now." And for me, that's the Dom to my Brian, the Letty to my Mia, the Roman to my Tej, the Gisele to my Han, the Ramsey to my Queenie, and new edition alert, the Jakob to my Cipher, Chanelle Berlin Johnson. Chanelle, we've made it. It's finally time to talk F9.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

Oh, I mean the road has been long and beautiful and so excited to finally be here and get to talk about this movie, which they always find a way to up the ante. I mean, we talked in the... When we were talking about eight, we talked about the way that they just had a crazy hook that was immediately, "All right, let's do it." And they'd done it again here. A long lost Toretto. What could be wilder?

Derek Lawrence:

All right. Like I said, the question everyone's been asking out there is like, "How is the guy who's always preaching about family have some family that we've never heard of?" On top of it, a brother, which... We're about to find out, that's for sure. Before we do, as a refresher for any new listeners, in case you're boycotting the franchise until Twinkie returned, we're binging all of the Fast movies with the family themselves. We've already chatted about the first 8 installments, so you can go back and check out our interviews with Vin Diesel, Ludacris, Lucas Black, Justin Lin, Jordana Brewster, Sung Kang, Michelle Rodriguez, Tyrese Gibson, and Nathalie Emmanuel. I mean, we said it last week, but still, I can't believe we got the whole family. I don't know. Maybe we can get Bow Wow for a special episode. I mean, I just took a little kind of shot at Twinkie, but I would love to have Bow Wow on. That would really just be the icing on top of the cake, wouldn't it?

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

Oh, I think so. That's a special one. I mean, a surprise for people that he's back in F9. It would be really nice and it's crazy to listen to that. I just Marvel that we've been able to do this with all of these people. I mean, we're just two geeks about this franchise and we're lucky enough to have them all talk to us and it's still mind-blowing.

Derek Lawrence:

Yeah. I'm sure whenever we're on the last episode, at least, until after F10, I'm sure we'll get emotional. So, we'll say that until then, but today's going to be a little different than a normal episode. On past installments, we went full spoilers, digging deep into the specifics of each film, but with this conversation dropping on June 25th, the glorious day that F9 is released. We know the world, what's going on. Not everyone maybe feels comfortable immediately going into a movie theater. Even I will say this movie has already made $300 million around the world. So, plenty of people have already seen it. So, shout out to our listeners not in the US. Thank you for listening and stay tuned for more we have coming.

So, with this episode being more of an F9 premium primer, who better to do that with than the newest Toretto, John Cena. As I just teased, don't worry. We'll be back next week with an all spoiler F9 episode, and there'll be so much to be discussed that we'll be joined by multiple members of the family. I'm not going to say who yet, but you're in for a couple of treats. So, keep tuning in. But Chanelle, before we get into our chat with John, who against all odds we actually could see, what do people need to know going into F9?

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

All right. Well, keep it simple and more teasy since we don't want to get into spoilers here, of course. So, the movie is brand new. So, of course, like we said, just when the Torettos think they might be out of the game, Dom and Mia's enstranged brother, Jakob, pulls them right back in and the team is tasked with stopping him. And, of course, Cipher's villainy still looms large, although it's not entirely clear to us how yet. Because of the adventure, the family also finds out that Han is still alive.

So, we know we're going to see how that unravels. And we also know that for some reason because of all this, they end up going to space. So, some huge things coming in F9. And we also... Plus like Vin Diesel told us way back in episode one of our BINGE pod here that there's a lot in this movie that directly ties back to the first film of the franchise. So, stick around to see how that unfolds as well. Lots of secrets, twists and turns. Huge, huge adventure in F9.

Derek Lawrence:

I mean, last week I complimented you on how much you pack into these summaries of each movie. And this one is like, "All right, yeah." You're like, "I'm going to keep this simple. I'm not getting into the details." And yet still we get a long lost brother, super spy brother at that, Han being alive and space, and then apparently an origin story. So, even well done, Chanelle. Even with not so much to work with, you still managed to work with a lot.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

And I mean, Justin Lin told us even with the two supersized trailers that we've had that there's so much more in these movies. So just imagine what we don't know yet.

Derek Lawrence:

That's true. So, you can definitely go back to past episodes. F9 has come up on every single one. So, there's been plenty of hints dropped. I mean, Justin Lin declared F9 the best Fast movie yet. Man, that's... As we talked about with him and with Ludacris, who's the one who first told us that tidbit like, Justin's not a guy, we've talked to him a lot of times now, he wouldn't just say something to say something." So, he really truly believes that, so we can't wait to see if he's right. I mean, I hope he is. That's a bold statement though to make when you've put Fast 5 into the world.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

True.

Derek Lawrence:

So I'll just leave it at. But all right. Let's now ride into our interview with John Cena. No awards this week. We'll be back with our special episode and we'll do that then. So, now, John Cena himself.

Derek Lawrence:

For the first eight Fast & Furious movies, we couldn't see John Cena, but now he's more visible than ever. John, welcome to our BINGE of Fast.

John Cena:

Thank you. I don't know how many comments are going to be like, "You're talking to no one. There's just a chair and green screen," and I welcome them all.

Derek Lawrence:

There's going to be so many, but I brought them on.

John Cena:

I bring the power of invisibility to Fast.

Derek Lawrence:

We needed that. There was so much other superhero stuff going on in the last few films. So, we needed that invisibility added to the franchise. Yeah. As I said, really excited to talk to you about F9. Already was a highly anticipated movie, but only even more so now after the last year plus after that first trailer dropped, so we're almost there. We're excited for it. What's it been like for you? Kind of the wait for this. The trailer drops, everyone's like, "Oh my God. He's played Dom's brother, another Toretto." And then it's like, "Oh, no. You have to wait for another 16 months or whatever."

John Cena:

Yeah. We won two Super Bowls ago, and we dropped this intense trailer that still leaves so much movie left. And in it, you find out that Han is back and that Dom Toretto has a brother. So, you get all of these questions and all this excitement, which is traditional around the release of a Fast film and all this buzz. And then we grab and hold onto the e-brake and now we're in a stop-down. I think the crew at Fast have put together a tremendous trailer that has revitalized everybody and got that energy and that buzz. That compounded with the fact that we're making great strides to a more safer, responsible environment, and it does seem as if we're ready to go back and enjoy cinema again. And I couldn't think of a better vehicle, absolute pun intended, to get people to come together. This movie is about family. This is a blockbuster movie. It delivers everything you'd want in a night at the movies and kind of symbolizes what go in the movies is all about. It gets people from all different walks of life together to be entertained and go on a zany adventure.

Derek Lawrence:

You kind of just did a little bit there, but we've been starting each of these episodes by quoting those famous words of Dominic Toretto. He lives his life a quarter mile at a time. For those 10 seconds or less, he's free. How would you sum up F9 in 10 seconds or less?

John Cena:

Absolute blockbuster. Delivers on everything that you'd want out of a cinema experience. It needs to be seen in theaters. And I'm so glad we can go back and see it in theaters.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

Perfect.

Derek Lawrence:

We've been waiting since... I mean, even more than two Super Bowls ago. Since the minute we knew this was coming. Before we dive into the kind of the presence of Fast & Furious, I want to go back to a simpler time. I actually ended up... I interviewed you for Blockers back in March, 2018. And we were talking and I told you there was a Fast & Furious joke in Blockers. And I had told you... I was like, "I can't not now picture you in a Fast & Furious movie. I need that to happen." And you said, it's like, "Obviously, that's out of my control, but that would be a dream come true." Now, here we are. You've made a Fast & Furious movie. Not only have you made one, you are a Toretto. What's it like knowing that dream came true?

John Cena:

First I guess I have to thank Ike Barinholtz and Leslie Mann because they joked about the Fast and the Furious. And what a great parody that was. They tried to channel their inner Dom Toretto and it went horribly wrong and it made for some good laughs. This is all surreal, man. All of it. It's a dream come true. And it's such a life-changing opportunity. I've never had anything like this. To be invited in a legacy body of work that is already tremendously successful and the world already anticipates. I really put my heart and soul into this and I'm very proud of what's going to show up on screen, but this movie is a success without me. And that's a testament to the cast and crew that have spent 20 years forging this legacy. I don't take that lightly. The invite has weight and it has tremendous perspective, and I really hope everyone sees the movie and thinks my contribution did justice to the legacy of this Fast.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

I think people are absolutely going to be satisfied and excited to see you in this film and saying it was a dream really implies to me that you sound like you were a fan of the films before that. So, what was your relationship to the Fast franchise before? Were you seeing the movies and dreaming of being in it?

John Cena:

So, it's weird. And kind of growing up and evolving as the Fast franchise has, I kind of grew up and evolved with it. I was drawn initially to the first one in Tokyo Drift because I'm a car freak. So, it captured my heart when it went after the zeitgeist of the tuna market, the import market, pitting American muscle versus tunas, that whole street racing philosophy. I love cars. To me, that's what one in three kind of signified. I still think one of the most powerful scenes in the franchise is when Don pulls up at the end Drift. Because as a viewer, you think one was a movie. Two, they went in a bit of a different direction with a different narrative and then three, they chose another different direction. So, you're kind of thinking like, "Okay, is this it?" This is the end. This is how it's going to end. To see that one scene at the end of Drift is like, "This is far from over."

And then after that, the franchise kind of took on a life of its own to be more global, to be more action-based, but then again, I was kind of traveling a similar path trying to be a global entertainer. So, I can understand the moves the franchise made and the fact that it grew and it's bigger now than it ever has been, but I'm more partial to the ones... We all have our reasons for falling. I'm more partial to the ones that focused around cars. And I always get giddy when they showcase cars in any Fast movie. Even Tyrese's poor choice of a Lamborghini in the ice. Stuff like that is really fun for me to see.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

Did you get to participate... Vin told us they always audition the cars. Did you get to participate in that at all or did you just want to show up and it was chosen for you?

John Cena:

So, I think those who can weigh in on what they drive, that's probably a seniority seat. But for somebody to be like, "Hey, man. You're going to be in F9 and here's the keys to a car." It could have been, for lack of a better term and pardon my French, a s----box. [inaudible 00:13:55] and drove it and try to drive the wheels off. So, I didn't want to overstep my bounds and kind of stay in my lane respectively, but I'm very glad with what I got to drive and what I got to see on set.

Derek Lawrence:

Take us back... So, obviously, you're a fan, but when this opportunity comes your way, how was it presented? What was your reaction to it? Because I know shortly before it came official, you met with Vin and he kind of put it out into the universe that maybe before it was fully real. So, just take us back through the whole process of it coming your way and you eventually becoming Jakob.

John Cena:

Yeah. So, I was scheduled to Vin for a conversation, and I met him. He has a gym that is dedicated to Fast that he uses to motivate himself to kind of prepare to be Dom. And we just started talking man. We just started talking about life and our values and perspectives, and that morphed more into conversations about the movies. And we're just talking like two human beings, but inside. One, it's the first time I've ever met Vin Diesel, so this is crazy. Two, I'm kind of also talking to Dom Toretto and like, "What the F is going on?" And then afterwards he's... Not afterwards. During, he kind of puts on his phone and kind of welcomes me into the family, but doesn't, and I just don't know what's going on. And I never expected anything more than to sit down and talk with the dude whom I admire. I admire his body of work. I think the film sends wonderful messages. He's entertained the world for 20 years. Me, like I said, as an entertainer, that's somebody I can learn from, that's somebody I can gain wisdom from, share perspectives that maybe other people can't in a certain conversation. I thought it was a great time. And then from that to where we are now, it's crazy. It's Dom Toretto. I literally remember seeing the cross for the first time. I'm like, "What's going on?" It's otherworldly. I couldn't imagine.

Derek Lawrence:

What's it like when... I think even in that video and he said it since. He kind of referenced Paul. He almost felt like Paul sent you his way, which is, obviously, someone who was a fan of the franchise and knows how important Paul was to it. When you hear him say something like that, kind of what does that mean to you?

John Cena:

I mean, it's really difficult to conceptualize something like that. I never had the chance to meet Paul. I don't know what the relationship between everyone was, but, man, the outpouring of emotion for this individual that had such dedication to the franchise, to his craft, to fans, to cars. It's not lost on me. The invite itself comes with expectations. When someone who was close to a member of the Fast family, so loved and so admired, brings up that and puts that in perspective, you go, immediately no days off. There wasn't before, but immediately it's like, "Okay, man. Please, even on those days that are tough and you wake up in the wrong side of the bed, leave it all in the lens." And there are now tremendous expectations set on your shoulders. And that's the way I like it, but I mean, what an unbelievable thing for someone to say. It's surreal. It's very difficult to conceptualize.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

At the same time too, first you get the comparison... Or not the comparison, but the invocation of Paul, and then also you're brought in and find out you're going to be a Toretto. That's double whammy of sort of pressure and also faith in you. So, when did you find out exactly what character they wanted you to play and what was your initial sort of reaction to that?

John Cena:

So, things kind of got shot out of a canon after that meeting with Vin and they started moving real fast. And they announced to me that I would be in the family and they sent me the script and they said they wanted me to specifically read Jakob and you read very early on that Jakob is a Toretto. So, I'm not getting invited to the franchise to be a standalone character or a character that needs to be developed. The last name alone is going to let viewers around the world ask questions. It's already teed up. So, not only are you getting an invite to this globally successful brand and franchise that, like I said, with or without me, they're going to crush. I get to be a Toretto. And yes, there's a lot of leaning into that story in F9 which is fantastic, but even if they don't, that's set up on a tee. It couldn't be more perfect, but once again, it also comes with tremendous expectations.

Derek Lawrence:

Yeah. I remember talking to Justin when the trailer came out and he's like, "Yeah." He's like, "When we came up with the idea of introducing an exploring family, actually through bloodlines for the first time, I was really excited," but then he's like, "I woke up the next morning, I was like... Oh, I was scared s---less. I was like, 'Who's going to be a Toretto?'" So, what were those conversations like with Justin and kind of try to figure out like, "How do I become a Toretto?"

John Cena:

So, I have the greatest sources of wisdom and perspective to sit under Justin and Vin and the rest of the cast. This isn't like a spin-off film where I'm a Toretto by myself. I got to sit with the people that created this and have been heavily involved in crafting it. And from Justin's perspective, someone who really found their way back to the franchise because they wanted to tell all these stories and tie up all these loose ends.

So, in that regard, it wasn't really challenging. It was more fun to explore the dynamic between brother versus brother, to talk about possibly the backstories. I mean, that's all creative stuff that you could go on and on and on about, but I guess basically my point is, I was put in the most informative, welcoming, encouraging environment that I could have possibly been put in with the heartbeat of Fast and Vin and someone like Justin who found his way back to the franchise because it's a story he desperately wants to tell. I couldn't have been in a better situation creatively.

Derek Lawrence:

I mean, Vin's someone who really is... He thinks a lot about these characters. I mean, you mentioned his garage and kind of like helping him get in the mindset of Dom. So, I'm sure he had a lot of thoughts about these brothers in this relationship. So, obviously, you guys had a great relationship, but what was those conversations like with Vin specifically about trying to discover who these brothers are together and separately?

John Cena:

It was great. Like I said, Vin has all the wisdom accrued of two decades worth of investing into this. I completely understand his perspective and his methods because for 20 years, I'm John Cena. And you do need a chance... There is a normal human being... There's a person underneath every persona. You do need a chance to kind of just get up to speed as that persona. And we all have our different methods, but Dom is somebody so universally recognized. Ball cap, jorts, and a T-shirt, I know what that's like. So, I totally get the perspective and the process and all that.

When it came down to conversations, it would start with a wide range of talking about my family, talking about his family, talking about what do we think fights and families are? What do we think reconciliations and families are like? Why do people do this? All these open-ended questions, and then we would just begin to cleave off sections and narrow down, and narrow down, and narrow down. And as someone who's trying to hone my skills as an actor, I mean, I really do feel comfortable in a WWE ring. That's kind of where I got my 10,000 hours. I'm still very much a rookie in this. To be able to be a wing man or sit under the learning tree under that creative process, it makes me better. It completely made me better.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

At the same time, talking about being in a WWE ring, you're used to performing stunts and stuff, but then you get on this huge facet and you've done other action movies too. Is there a moment where you sort of have to adjust to seeing it on the script and then you get there and it's like, "Oh, I got to perform this thing that's high in the air or these car tricks or anything like that." What is that like?

John Cena:

No, I never would. And action in film is so much different than live action performance. In WWE, it happens as it happens and there is no going wrong because you see what you see. In film, not only... If something isn't perfect, you continue to attack it until it's perfect, but when it's perfect, you then have to attack it from multiple angles. I mean, it is arduous and you are beat up because it is not just 30 minutes of action. And that's a long performance in WWE. It's weeks. The confrontation between Vin and I was discussed that it had to have certain elements, and it was very arduous and very long, but I don't regret any of it. I also take every professional's word for what I can and can't accomplish. I'm working with people who make what's onscreen look like the mythical seem every day. So when they say, "Hey, we're going to do this and we need you. And we're going to do this, and you're going to sit this one out, pal." I completely trust all second unit, all stunt performers. In fact, they're literally the best. What they do is unbelievable. So, it's two very different attitudes. I'm still kind of adjusting to the way action is done in film, but I understand it, and that was something I struggled with early on.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

Is that something that you get help too from the other cast members as well because they've done all of this over and over and gotten bigger with the franchise? Did they have tips and stuff for you or, I don't know, advice?

John Cena:

Every day onset. Every day onset and when we got to hang out off set, when the cameras weren't rolling. And this is, obviously, pre-pandemic. Those were the most special times because everyone in the... I'm the new guy, so I'm just kind of eyes and ears open. And even when we're hanging out... When Vin gets everybody together, every person made it a point to come up to me to ask questions, to tell anything that was on their mind. I mean, I love conversation. So, I really held those moments close and there's a bunch of different personalities on set. There are people who are more intrinsic, there are people who are more extroverted, but every single person put it upon themselves to spend time with me and to put into perspective what was going on, where they held this body of work in their mind and their heart and moving forward, hoping we can make it the best we can. And I think that's what the common goal that everyone shares. You have all these diverse personalities from different walks of life, but they all just want to make a great movie.

Derek Lawrence:

What's it like... You talked about all these conversations you had with Vin or Justin, but for yourself in preparing to play Jakob... Obviously, Dom is such a larger than life character. We've been watching him for 20 years. So, coming in as his brother, did you feel like you had to be like Vin at all or like Dom, or was the whole point of the character being kind of totally different, that kind of the ying to his yang? As you were preparing just on your own, what were your thoughts in that way?

John Cena:

So, like I said, creativity is an open process. It's kind of like making soup. Everybody has their own recipe. Mine was to take chances and not be afraid, and then listen to the feedback I was given. If I took a chance on a personality trait or a reaction or a delivery of something that I thought was, "This is what I think I'm reading." And then they say, "Cut." And if Vin or Justin or whomever comes over and be like, "Okay, great. Could you try this? Or what do you think about something like this?" I wouldn't marry myself to that one concept just because it was my perspective. I think there's a lot to be learned in life looking at similar instances from different perspectives. And I got to hand it to Justin, Vin, and everyone else. They allowed me that room to take those chances. I was first introduced to that kind of concept, not only in a WWE ring where you get to improvise, but Judd Apatow and Amy Schumer were very instrumental in allowing me to improvise and take chances.

And a lot of the stuff I did was not funny, but out of all the not funny stuff, they got about six minutes of good laughs. So, it was their encouragement to be like, "Just go for it." And that same sort of environment, that same sort of protective environment is in Fast. They allow you to go for it, but they also... It's open dialogue of like, "Hey, this was my perspective. Explain yours." There's a lot of open conversation about what we're trying to achieve.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

For this, you also talked about... I know in the past we've talked about you get to play good guy roles and stuff. And this is the first one, I think, where you're pretty firmly set up as an antagonist. So, does that change how you approach things as well or do you still start from the same place of like, "Jakob clearly believes in what he's doing," and then kind of work backwards? How does that work for you?

John Cena:

That's a great question and a great perspective. I've told the live action story of good versus evil for a long time. And as a good guy, even amidst polarizing audience reaction, you still have to understand the main characteristics of a good guy. And to understand that, you also have to understand the main characteristics of what you want out of a bad guy or an antagonist. And I believe the most important thing to the antagonist is they believe what they're doing is right, and everyone else is wrong. They're universally accepted of like, "What does this person think they're doing?" But this person has truth and enough truth to their argument to justify their actions, but they are doing harm. And they're the only ones that can't see that and everyone else can. So, I started there of what I'm doing has purpose and has truth behind it, just everyone else is wrong and they don't see it. And that was a good place to start. And then kind of working backwards to provide what I thought was needed to be a good antagonist.

Derek Lawrence:

I kind of appreciated that. It felt like a nice contrast to the first movie where it's like... Dom's kind of set up as the bad guy in that first film. Obviously, he doesn't view himself that way. And by the end, he's not either. But for you coming in as this literal blood rival, why did you think Jakob felt like the perfect test at this point for Dom?

John Cena:

So, first of all, what a cool perspective on a nine film character arc. And I think that's what's really special about Fast. If you've never seen a Fast movie before, you can go to F9 and be blown away. And you won't be scratching your head about like, "I don't get it. What are they doing?" You'll just go and have a fun blockbuster ride and enjoy the movie, but if you want to take a look at it, you're looking at it like, "Wow, it's taken an arc of nine movies to kind of come full circle with Dom, but is this what they were up to all along? Have they written this tale all along?" It's really cool to dive into that, and that's where I think Vin and somebody like Justin are really special because they don't leave those ropes hanging. They try to tie everything up, so you, as the viewer, can get it as invested as you want.

And I think the juxtaposition between personalities between Dom and Jakob is extremely important. To me, the subtext of Dom's greatest obstacle is his past. I think that there's something huge there and there's something that can be taken away from Hackman. A lot of stuff that holds us back in life is our inability to jump. And a lot of the inability to jump comes from us not being able to admit what happened in the past. I think that there's a lot to unpack there if you want, or if you just want to go out and watch a great action movie, you can do that too.

Derek Lawrence:

Yeah. I remember Vin telling us, he's like, "Yeah..." We were talking to him about the first movie and he's like, "Yeah, the cool thing is F9, you're going to be able to understand that first movie even more after F9." Which he says kind of mind blowing. 20 years later, you're like, "This is the ultimate long game that they pulled off." When I say they've been doing this for 20 years, we're literally at the 20 year anniversary. So, you've talked a lot about how great the family was welcoming you in, but what's the challenge in... They know these characters so well. Vin, Michelle, Jordana. So, you're coming in and you're still trying to figure out who Jakob is, what makes him tick, all of those things. So, what's it like kind of working opposite them in that way? And, like I said, obviously it sounds like they were really helpful.

John Cena:

They were tremendously helpful and easy because I'm not starting from scratch. And everyone could give an anecdote about... Or most everyone could give an anecdote about how this character had affected their backstory. And these are thoughts that they've only had to consider just recently because Jakob was just brought into the fold just recently, but every one of them is so into it that they would offer like, "Well, we ever considered that this happened," or maybe something like this and that spawns a whole new track of thought to explain the behavior that's written in the words. And everyone was super helpful, man.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

At the same time with that too, there's obviously another Toretto sibling. Jordana Brewster is in F9. Obviously, you don't want to get too deep into exactly what happens, but can you, I guess, talk a little about working with her and then trying to develop at least that relationship between Jakob and Mia without giving too much?

John Cena:

Jordana was great. And I think you now have three bloodline personalities, three bloodline Toretto personalities, each with a different form of expression. And in those moments where Dom shows something, but hides something and Jakob shows something, but can't confront something, Mia can be that glue. Mia can be that midpoint. She has a different form of presentation and is invested in loving so much in the family. I don't know, she's so needed and so wonderful. And it was a pleasure working with her. And it's just... That's another moment where I was starstruck, but I think when you take the Toretto siblings in totality, especially in F9, it begins to become more exciting, as you said, as we kind of continue to tell the story on this long game that is the legacy of Fast.

Derek Lawrence:

Yeah. I know. The fans were all excited and wondering like, "Oh, she's going to be back." Because obviously she wasn't in Fate of the Furious for obvious reasons, but it would have felt weird if the other... Because it's like, "Yeah, this is Dom's brother, but this is also Mia's brother as well." I feel like when the trailer came out and it's like, "Oh." That moment of Letty revealing that Jakob is Dom's brother. Very great dramatic moment in the trailer, the pause that we get. But what would you say? Obviously, everyone's like, "Man, this guy is obsessed with family. How have we never heard about this long lost brother?" Again, we'll get the answers out there, but for people coming in that are like, "Wait, what the heck is going on?" How would you kind of tee that up for them?

John Cena:

Oh, sure. And this is something that if you've never watched a Fast film before, Fast has done so well in its eight installments. And I think this is the reason that it continues to grow and have reach around the world is that even in the very first one, it approached the concept of family or those people that you love. They don't necessarily have to have your last name. They're the people that you love, are loyal to you, you're loyal to them. You all have the same purposes and values and you can come from all different walks of life. When you watch the first Fast, this is a film that literally heralded inclusivity and diversity. They were really early adapters to those philosophies and it wasn't forced. It's super organic because of the nature of street racing culture. It brings everyone together. Car culture essentially brings us all together because it's something that cars and transportation affect all of our lives.

So, this franchise that was built off of street racing culture was... Whoever knew it was going to blow up to be something like this really did embrace inclusivity and the concept of family are those closest to you. And I think film after film, after film, barbecue after barbecue, that's the important concept of being thankful to have people around you that you love, trust, and believe in, and that believe in you. To me, that's a super important concept of the film.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

So, with F9 and Suicide Squad and Vacation Friends, you got a lot lined up right now. And have you even had time to fully fathom just how crazy this next few months, next year is going to be for you? And people seeing you all in these big projects. What are you feeling, I guess, right now on the cusp of all of these releases?

John Cena:

Thanks for asking. That's an interesting perspective. I always try to be as present as I can, and there's not a day goes by where I don't take at least a moment in a day and realize how lucky I am and how fortunate I am. And I really just try to do the best I can with every opportunity. I think my past work speaks for itself. I'm very passionate and dedicated to things I choose to apply myself to. So, I know there'll be a whole lot more failures than there will success and that's just the nature of human existence. We go through a lot more hardship than we have high points. So, I hope all these things go well and we'll release them to the world and how they're accepted will craft the next series of opportunities. And then I'll go from there.

Derek Lawrence:

We see how long this cast has been together, but it also feels like Fast loves to bring someone in and kind of let them cook. The Rock shows up in Fast 5 and you're just like... His intro is legendary. I watch it every time. I've died laughing. I'm so pumped. Jason Statham for seven, Charlize Theron for eight. So, you're coming in here and it feels like you're adding this new energy like they did. It's like this new jolt. Did you kind of look at it that way too? Obviously, you're coming in and you're like, "I'm part of the family. This is their thing. They've been here." But do you also kind of look at it from that perspective too that you can bring this maybe new energy to it?

John Cena:

Well, I mean... Yeah, I think so. Like I said, this movie is a success without me. So, I think understanding that and having a great understanding of Fast is going to be Fast. It's not going to be nor does it need to be the John Cena show. That really allows me to contribute to Fast the best I can. And like I said, it allows me to take chances and be bold and be the best Jakob Toretto that I possibly can be. I really looked at this opportunity, not trying to change the world because the world isn't broken. I'm trying to add to it. I'm trying to make a contribution that adds to the success of the franchise and whether that's just for standalone F9 or whether it has a future, that's beyond my control. That's like the conversation we had at the Blockers interview, but I got a chance and I really think I did a good job understanding of what the opportunity was and the perspective that I should take. And then hopefully everybody enjoys.

Derek Lawrence:

You mentioned earlier the kind of the significance of the chain like when you saw the necklace for the first time. So, was it like... You see it on Vin, he's wearing it, but then what happens when you put that on for the first time? And you're staring down at Vin as Dom on set. What was that... Take us back to that moment.

John Cena:

Yes. Man, it's tough to put that into words, especially when... And someone who isn't dedicated to the franchise and isn't a long follower doesn't understand that, but I just ask them and maybe trying to send a message to people who can't conceptualize that. Think of the thing you're the most passionate about. Think of the thing you're the most dedicated to. Think of the show or the form of entertainment, music, or whatever. Think of the pinnacle of that. And then in your first chance, in your first opportunity, you come face-to-face with the pinnacle of that which you are passionate about. And you are given a relic that defines that pinnacle and you are treated as equals or in some cases greater than in your first chance. Surreal, surreal. I always compare everything to WWE that would be like face-to-face with the Rock, face-to-face with Undertaker, face-to-face with Vince McMahon and then being worried. That just doesn't happen. It doesn't happen. It was surreal, man.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

From our perspective, I can just tell you just seeing it even in the trailer. It's awesome, and it makes total sense and it just felt right seeing. I want to go back really quick as Derek mentioned, of course, bringing other characters and there is at least like a little bit. We get a tiny view of you and Charlize Theron's character. Don't really obviously know what kind of totally unfolds there, but what was it like working with her?

John Cena:

That was a very special experience. She is tremendously gifted and as a person who is on another level in the aspects of performance. Being able to work with someone like that... I've worked... I'm so sorry that I talk about WWE so much, but I feel I'm on a similar learning trajectory. I got to work with a lot of experienced performers in WWE and that's how I gained my instincts and I just shut my mouth and listened. And I took the same sort of learning tree approach with everyone on Fast, but Charlize especially is just so, so talented. And just being around her when she does her thing makes me better. That's how good she is. I just have to sit there and shut up and let her perform. And by me being associated with that performance, it makes me better. And also in doing so, I could learn a tremendous amount from watching her perform. What a luxury that was.

Derek Lawrence:

It's kind of insane. We know the usual cast in these movies, but then every time I think about like, "Wait a minute. Charlize Theron, Helen Mirren and Kurt Russell are in this movie on top of everyone else." It's real insanity. And what I love about Charlize in this movie is she knows the movie she's in. You know what I mean? She can go do all sorts of different things, but she doesn't show up doing what you would do in some Oscar bait type movie. She's like, "I'm in this action movie. And this is how I fit into it." Which is, obviously, the sign of a great actor.

You mentioned coming face-to-face with the Rock in your WWE kind of comparison. I remember when we had that Blockers conversation, his name came up because obviously he's becomes such a big part of this franchise. Have you thrown... I know you don't seem like somebody who comes in and is making requests and be like, "Oh, I'd love for my car to do this." Have you put your toe in the water of like, "Oh, what about maybe Jakob and Hobbs have a quick run in somewhere down the road?"

John Cena:

No, man. Like I said, I don't even know if Jakob's future is uncertain, and that's completely up to the audience. The one thing that Fast does extremely well is they listen to their fans. I think "justice for Han" is a great example of that. They listen to the global fan base. So, there's no way for me to even start. It would be such a waste of time and effort and energy and planning expectations that could ultimately just be let downs. I just want to enjoy them now. And for me, the now is... I've had to wait patiently as we all have. F9 is finally coming out in theaters, and this thing finally is real. And if Jakob Toretto is F9 and that's it, still, what an awesome thing to be able to grab the wheel of an automobile in a Fast & Furious franchise and be on screen doing that. That to me is what's in front of me and what's important, and I'll let those who make those decisions figure out where the story goes after.

Derek Lawrence:

I mean, you mentioned the fans and... So, are you nervous at all at how people will react to Jakob? Because obviously this is... He's coming into the family and causing some trouble.

John Cena:

Yeah. So, I learned from a very wise man a long time ago. I've had some fortunate circumstances, but I've also had a lot of setbacks. And during one of those major setbacks, somebody who I consider a mentor and a father figure explained to me... He asked me two questions. He said, "Did you do the absolute best you could?" And my answer was, yes. He said, "Did you promote the absolute best you could?" I said my answer was yes. He said, "Well, what else can you do?" I've given everything to the lens, absolutely everything. Moments of embarrassment, humility, vulnerability, and let Justin, Vin and those people who craft the narrative take what I gave them and try to make it the best I can. I love the movie. And that's why I'm sitting here talking to you today. That's why I've been in this chair, in this green void, and I'll continue to do so until this thing comes out and we can get as many people back in cinemas as we possibly can. So, I've done my best. I patiently waited and now it's time to tell everybody about it and get that Fast buzz back in the air and get people excited to go in the cinemas. And if they see it, and they ain't ready for it, there's really nothing more I could do.

Derek Lawrence:

Yeah. That makes a lot of sense. And you mentioned early on you being a big Tokyo Drift fan. So, what's it like... You start reading the script and you're reading it for Jakob and then you find out, "Wait a minute. Han's coming back too?" For you as a big Tokyo Drift fan, that had to blow your mind.

John Cena:

I'm not in the business of spoilers, but there's a whole lot more in the movie as well. It's a really fun ride. And once again, I relate everything to WWE. There's always somebody who tries to get information beforehand. And I never understood that because the joy of someone sitting there being entertained is why we make the movie. It's why we have the match. And we're all in a conversation where we've all experienced that, but man, if my words keep someone back in their seat instead of moving them up to the edge, where's the win in that for me? And especially because we've been this patient.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

So close.

John Cena:

It's been a long time. And knowing you have such a great movie in the bank, you're like, "God, can I just get it out there?!" So, we're so close and I just don't want to steal anybody's moment. Like I said, if you're walking into a Hollywood blockbuster and you have no experience, I think you're going to have a great time. And if you know the franchise, it's a super fun ride, man. And to see in the trailer, Han come in with his bag of snacks, oh man, that's a moment. That's a moment.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

Did you get to spend time with Sung Kang because he's huge into cars also? And also told us a lot about how the Fast franchise gave him a lot of access to more in car culture. So, have you talked to him about that and what you guys can get into from here? Even just hanging out.

John Cena:

So, I think the repeated message you hear about Sung is he's an amazing human being and I'll absolutely be another person that relays that message. He's kind, he listens, he's empathetic, he offers support, and he loves cars. So, it was really good to interact with him. It was only brief. As you'll see in the movie, it's not a lot of interaction, but he really is a really good person to talk to, and has a tremendous story. And once you find out all that stuff, you're even more glad that he's back. Like, yeah, man. Absolutely justice for Han. That was a multi-layered approach. And the more you get to know him, I think the more you appreciate it.

Derek Lawrence:

I've been telling people about... When I remember watching the trailer, and this was back when we could actually be in offices, and I had my headphones in. I'm watching the live stream from the Super Bowl. And first off, they reveal you're Dom's brother. I lose my mind. And then you said Han comes in just snacking. And I literally like... I had my headphones and I stand up. I'm screaming, and then I look around and everyone's just staring at me because they have no idea what I was doing. So, yeah. That moment just at the trailer. As I told you, Justin, I can't believe they put that much on the trailer, but as he keeps promising, we have even more still to come.

John Cena:

And then when they drop the second trailer, I watched it thinking like, "Okay. Are they going to give away too much?" But the second trailer is just as riveting, just as exciting, just as charged. There's still so much movie left. There's still so much movie left.

Derek Lawrence:

Oh my gosh. Getting excited just talking to you about it. At the top of the conversation, I referenced our chat a couple years ago about Blockers and you had kind of talked about... And Chanelle just referenced how all these incredible looking movies that you have coming up where you said back maybe 2009 period you were like, "Okay. I'm just not doing movies again." In your mind, you didn't think it worked out and it was maybe... Obviously, it was part of the WWE kind of model. So, does that give you some extra kind of gratitude knowing where you are now looking back to where you were in 2009?

John Cena:

Let's just throw this out. I've been given a second chance at the movies - who the hell gets a first chance? What's going on? Like I said, I'll have a lot more failures than successes. So, when I began to pursue roles and the initial roles that I've found more riveting were comedy roles. Roles that I could spoof myself and show another side of myself that I hadn't been able to show in WWE. So, then I began to look at like, "Why am I doing this? Why am I drawn to this? Why do I now have passion for this as well as WWE?" I love to tell stories. I don't want to go into the octagon. I want to go into the ring because I love telling stories through action, and I love those narratives. It is like a mini Fast movie. To our disposal, we use the greatest tools we can to make the most mythical come to life. And that's what I enjoy.

And once I found out I could be comfortable in different characters and be more vulnerable and take more chances, I really have now a passion for making film and making content and making TV. I just did it for the wrong reasons. And I did it for what I felt was the right reasons. If we could make movie stars out of WWE performers, more people would come to WWE events, but all those times I was sitting idly on a movie set from 2004 to 2009, I wanted to be on the canvas. I wanted to be in the ring. I was a young man, stronger than I've ever been in my life, feeling invincible, and I was in a craft that I felt comfortable. That I felt I was gaining my 10,000 hours. So, I felt at home.

And then I have to be drawn to these sets to... It's a very patient process, and one that I've had to develop my own perspective towards, but as a 20-something and a 30-something living the life of a go to a different city every night, tear it up, everybody's excited you're there, and then do it again and again, and again, and again, five nights a week, every week, 52 weeks a year. Man, I just wanted to be there. And now, physically, I'm a little different. Mentally, I'm certainly a lot more wise. I have a different perspective on everything and I do love the nuance of film and I respect the nuance of film. I understand why it takes so long to hang that light. And I respect it because it's supposed to look a certain way. And when you watch it on screen, it does feel a certain way. And I've been part of a lot of bad movies. So, when you try to rush the process, well, you get what you get.

So, once again, I think through failure, I found out who I am and what I'm passionate about. And it's amazing you say that because I remember that conversation vividly that I had with the one person who is kind of my one man team. And I remembered being like, "Yo, we're never doing movies again, are we?" And he was like, "You're right." And here we are, an overnight sensation that's taken us 20 years.

Derek Lawrence:

Kind of going off what we were just talking about. Again, not to keep referencing. I feel like we had just a great Blockers conversation, why it keeps coming back up. But like you said, it's obviously been a process of, I guess pun intended, like people seeing past just the John Cena they've come to know from WWE. And I remember I felt like Blockers was a big step because it's like... Yeah, obviously, he's this massive man on screen, but also, he just seems like a suburban dad who's worried about his daughter having sex on her prom night. So, do you feel like you've kind of moved past that, you've been able to shed that, or is it still kind of a ever evolving thing?

Man, I hope I never move past it. I think that's... Perspective is everything. Yes, I think we all have this intrinsic force that we want to be known as our entire selves, not just for what people may think regardless of profession. I think we all want to be known for who we are as a whole rather than just a section of, I give you something and you judge who I am off of that something. That's very difficult sometimes, but when you started the interview with like, "Man, it's just going to be a chair and a green screen." That means something I've done in my life has affected you and it stuck with you. And that's why I love the memes, and I love... The internet introduced me to a whole new generation of fans, which has allowed me to do what I love for longer than I should be able to do it. That's amazing.

And I never, ever want to shake the ball cap, wearing t-shirt, double wristband, jorts, sneakers, John Cena. That character took me 20 years to evolve. I think a great parallel, especially pertinent to this conversation, would be to ask Vin if he ever wants to shed himself of Dom Toretto. Now, the Dom Toretto arc cycle of life. Everything comes to an end, but I don't think he'll ever get tired or fed up with being known as Dom Toretto because he knows the contribution and his work is stuck with people. And that's what we try to do as entertainers. We tell story after story, after story and hope something sticks.

I did set a difficult hurdle for myself by playing one character for 20 years, and that was tough to kind of jump out of. And it took about 10 years for that to matriculate. And even now, people still bring back the relationship, but I nevermind it. I hope I never shake it. It's part of me. It's part of who I am. It's been a major part of my life and I just hope my contributions to these characters, to Jakob or to peacemaker or to the dad in Blockers or whomever it may be, I hope people just get lost. And I think that's been my main focus of what I'm trying to do so people don't look up on the screen and be like, "Yo, the car is driving itself." I hope they just get lost in the movie, and then if they want to make the joke a couple of days after they see the movie, but my biggest obstacle now is to have them just get lost in the experience of the movie.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

Talking about evolution for yourself, was there anything in this movie because it sort of requires you to be like a big action force, but also there is that undercurrent of family and pathos throughout this movie. Was there anything about that that felt... Did you discover new parts of yourself, I guess, or what you were capable of on camera working with these different people who have been in this world a long time?

John Cena:

So, I believe that we don't find opportunity. I believe opportunity finds us and you just have to be prepared and be brave enough to take it. Fast found me at the right time of my life. A time where I certainly I'm much more vulnerable, I'm much more expressive, I'm much more comfortable about leaning into the uncomfortable. But I'm also who you've come to see in your living room every Monday and Friday night for a long period of time. There's also that side to me as well.

So, I think combining the two elements, I really had a lot of fun diving into sibling relationship and blood family at its core and struggles between people who bear the same last name. It was really cool. I was kind of on that path of discovery before being invited into Fast, but I really got to accelerate that process because the story was about... Essentially, I got four brothers. I can snag little bits and pieces from F9 and put my regular life in there.

Derek Lawrence:

What would be your... Obviously, we've talked a lot about the excitement around F9, but for you knowing it's finally coming and knowing how long fans have been waiting for this, kind of what would be your message to them as we kind of inch towards the finish line?

John Cena:

It delivers. It's simple. It delivers. And everybody's been patient, and we're at such a good point where we feel that people can responsibly and safely go back to the cinema and enjoy it. And you want that first experience to give you everything you miss about the movies. F9 delivers. Flat out, straight up, it delivers.

Derek Lawrence:

It really does. I will say I've still been... I wish we could have found a pound or something for F9. You know what I mean? A 2 Fast 2 Furious or Fate of the Furious type situation. I kept brainstorming on my end, but I never landed on anything. So, I can also be mad about it in that way.

John Cena:

Well, maybe someday we'll talk again about another one that'll have a different title.

Derek Lawrence:

I've been joking. I didn't come up with that. I feel like Fast 10 has to be like "FasTen Your Seat Belts". That's just like sitting there. That's a layup, right? Let's put that out into the universe and hopefully Justin brings home. Well, John, thank you so much for taking the time. We love nothing more than talking about this movie. So, we really appreciate.

Thanks again John Cena for joining us and digging deep. And it was fun. It was like you could tell.. Chanelle, you said earlier, we're geeks about this. You get the feeling that this isn't just a job for John. He's a Fast fan. He said the first and the third ones are his favorites. So, you got to respect that. So, it's nice to geek out with another geek.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

Yeah, it's beautiful. And I think such a testament to this franchise that people, again, come into it and they're excited to be here for very specific reasons because they connected with something in the movies. And he's a perfect example of that. And so, it's wonderful to be able to talk about it. Of course, we didn't get into spoilers, but even just him talking about working with all of these people, just the energy of that, it was beautiful.

Derek Lawrence:

Yeah, absolutely. So thanks to John. And like Brian O'Conner, we hope you earned your respect and that you keep listening to EW's BINGE of the Fast Saga. We're getting so, so close to the end of the BINGE road. So, we hope you stay strapped in for the ride. In the meantime, please subscribe and listen along every week, wherever you get your podcasts. Rate us, tell us what you think, share it with your friends and family.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

You can find us on twitter @derekjlawrence or me @chanelleberlin.

Derek Lawrence:

Also, head to ew.com for complete coverage of the Fast Saga and full episode transcripts.

Chanelle Berlin Johnson:

This episode was hosted and produced by Derek Lawrence and Chanelle Berlin Johnson. Produced, edited, and mixed by Samee Junio and executive produced by Carly Usdin and Shana Naomi Krochmal.

Derek Lawrence:

Thanks for listening. And until next time, salud mi familia.

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