By Christian Holub
August 11, 2020 at 01:38 PM EDT
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Gregg DeGuire/FilmMagic

Today marks the sixth anniversary of beloved comedian Robin Williams' death. His daughter Zelda Williams announced ahead of time that she would be taking a break from social media to protect herself from being overwhelmed by the flood of tribute messages. Instead of responding to such remembrances, Zelda shared links to mental health resources for those in need of assistance.

"It's hard for me on regular, good days to remain the person expected to graciously accept the world's need to share their memories of him and express their condolences for his loss," Zelda wrote in a message posted to Twitter on Monday. "As I've said in the past, while I am constantly touched by all your boundless continued love for him, some days it can feel a bit like being seen as a roadside memorial — a place, not a person — where people drive past and leave their sentiments to then go about their days comforted their love for him was witnessed."

Zelda continued, "in my stead, if you find yourself in crisis and seek out this page hoping to be close to him somehow, please, use any of the following resources if you find you need them."

In replies to the original tweet, Zelda posted phone numbers and contact information for the National Suicide Prevention Hotline, the Trevor Project, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration's national helpline, among others.

Last month, on what would have been Robin's 69th birthday, Zelda announced she would be donating $69.69 to "as many local homeless shelters as I can," and encouraged everyone to enjoy "at least one hearty, immature belly laugh on Dad today."

Last week, EW premiered the trailer for Robin's Wish, a new documentary about the comedian's final days detailing his battle with a neurodegenerative disorder known as Lewy Body Dementia. Directed by Tylor Norwood, the documentary features interviews with the late actor's widow Susan Schneider Williams, as well as celebrity friends like Shawn Levy, John R. Montgomery, and David E. Kelley.

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