Bob Weinstein's letter will be published in a new book written by New York Times reporters Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, whose October 2017 exposé was the impetus behind the movie producer’s historic fall.

By Maria Pasquini
September 09, 2019 at 01:02 PM EDT
Each product we feature has been independently selected and reviewed by our editorial team. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

Years before allegations of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual misconduct were made public, his brother Bob Weinstein confronted him about his “misbehavior,” according to a letter which will be published in full in a new book about the scandal.

She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement (available for purchase Tuesday), is written by Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporters for The New York Times, whose October 2017 exposé was the impetus behind the movie producer’s historic fall and the launch of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements.

One excerpt from the book details a letter Bob wrote to his brother in 2015, where he urged him to seek medical treatment, according to the Times.

“You have brought shame to the family and your company through your misbehavior,” his brother, and longtime co-chair of The Weinstein Co. wrote in the letter. “Your reaction was once more to blame the victims, or to minimize the misbehavior in various ways. If you think nothing is wrong with your misbehavior so in this area then announce it to your wife and family.”

Mark Von Holden/Getty Images

According to the Times, Bob explained to the writers that he mistakenly believed his brother’s problems were related to sex addiction and eventually stopped trying to address them.

“I got worn out,” he told Kantor and Twohey. “I said, ‘I surrender,’ see?”

“Bob long believed that Harvey was a sex addict engaged in persistent philandering, and, therefore, Bob repeatedly implored his brother to seek treatment from a doctor who specialized in sex addiction, including in the 2015 letter, as well as after he wrote that letter, which also addressed Harvey’s behavior toward Bob and his verbal abuse of others,” Bob’s attorney said in a statement provided to The Wrap. “Although Harvey promised Bob he would heed his advice and get the help Bob believed he needed, he apparently never did.”

Ronan Farrow, who also won a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on Weinstein, will be releasing his own book about the scandal called Catch and Kill.

“Catch and Kill is a true account of the extreme tactics powerful men use to cover up crimes and abuse—and of the sources who took huge personal risks to expose the truth,” Farrow, 31, told PEOPLE in an exclusive statement about the book, which will be released on Oct. 15.

A spokesperson for Weinstein has previously told PEOPLE in a statement that “any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein. Mr. Weinstein has further confirmed that there were never any acts of retaliation against any women for refusing his advances.”

In March, multiple reports revealed that Weinstein had reached a tentative $44 million agreement that would see him compensate women who have sued him for alleged sexual misconduct and board members of his former movie company, while settling a pending civil-rights lawsuit by the New York State Attorney General’s Office. Weinstein has plead not guilty to all charges.

Weinstein is set to go to trial in January 2020 for charges of rape, predatory sexual assault and criminal sexual act based on the accusations of two women, according to The Washington Post.

Advertisement

Comments

EDIT POST