Stephanie Geddes
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November 09, 2018 at 11:05 AM EST

Erin Lee Carr is ready to tell her story.

The acclaimed documentary filmmaker and daughter of the late, great New York Times journalist David Carr will publish her memoir All That You Leave Behind next year, a coming of age story which interweaves themes of love, family, and addiction. After her father shockingly collapsed in the newsroom of The New York Times back in 2015, Carr, reeling from the loss, reviewed their lifetime of correspondence, in which they shared nearly 2,000 items of communication in total.

What started as an exercise in grief quickly grew into an active investigation: Did her father’s writings contain the answers to the questions of how to move forward in life and work without your biggest champion by our side? In her book, Erin unpacks their complex relationship, their mutual addictions and challenges with sobriety, and the powerful sense of work and family that comes to define them.

The Mommy Dead and Dearest director has exclusively shared a first-look of her memoir with EW, in the form of a cover reveal and a short but illuminating excerpt. Read on below. All That You Leave Behind publishes April 30, 2019 and is available for pre-order.

Penguin Random House

Excerpt from All That You Leave Behind, by Erin Lee Carr

In our household, when I was growing up, there was no TV allowed on weekdays, only books. We were going to be strong readers, come hell or high water. As a teenager I fell in love with movies instantly and read all the books on cinema I could get my grubby little hands on. Every Monday, I knew what went huge (or fell flat) at the box office that weekend and would often recite the statistics over my Honey Nut Cheerios at the breakfast table. My bible was Entertainment Weekly, and in a tribute I hung up my favorite covers, plastering every wall in my bedroom. When my dad invited Jay Woodruff, then assistant managing editor of EW, to visit my EW shrine, he said, “So this is what it feels like to be stalked.”

In my ongoing obsession, I compiled a list of hundreds of movies to discuss with my dad. If they were rated R he had to determine whether my fourteen-year-old brain could handle it. I loved spending time with him in this way. From City of God to Donnie Darko to an ill-advised screening of Stephen Frear’s The Grifters, movies were our thing.


Excerpted from All That You Leave Behind by Erin Lee Carr. Copyright © 2019 by Erin Lee Carr. Excerpted by permission of Ballantine Books, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, New York. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher

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