Leah Greenblatt
Leah Greenblatt

Leah Greenblatt

Leah Greenblatt is the critic at large at Entertainment Weekly, covering movies, music, books, and theater. She is a member of the New York Film Critics Circle, and has been writing for EW since 2004.
Let there be Mavericks, Bollywood magic, and a Cate Blanchett maestro on the loose.
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What's worth your time in movies and TV this weekend? EW's critics review the latest releases: Emancipation, Spoiler Alert, Sr., Violent Night, and The Eternal Daughter.
Director Antoine Fuqua tilts true history into a brutal, broad-strokes action thriller elevated by his central star's performance.
The 2019 murder mystery gets a big, fizzy reup in Rian Johnson's celebrity-stacked latest.
What's worth your time in movies and TV this weekend? EW's critics review the latest releases: Devotion, The Son, Lady Chatterley's Lover, and Pitch Perfect: Bumper in Berlin.
What's worth your time in movies and TV this weekend? EW's critics review the latest releases: Welcome to Chippendales, Bones and All, The Menu, She Said, and The Inspection.
A classic tale gets a twist — and a full pop treatment — in Broadway's newest jukebox musical.
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Ralph Fiennes and Anya Taylor-Joy go knives out at the restaurant from hell.
A classic tale gets a twist — and a full pop treatment — in Broadway's newest jukebox musical.
Ralph Fiennes and Anya Taylor-Joy go knives out at the restaurant from hell.
Zoe Kazan and Carey Mulligan star as the reporters who took down Harvey Weinstein in this engaging if sometimes artless dramatization.
What's worth your time in movies and TV this weekend? EW's critics review the latest releases: Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, Tulsa King, The Fabelmans and The English.
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The franchise loses its beloved star, but finds elegant, affecting new ways to expand the MCU.
The best-selling author of The Family Fang and Nothing to See Here reflects on a few of his favorite things.
With the holidays fast approaching, EW’s critics celebrate the sideways cinematic canon, where very unusual things happen around the most wonderful time of the year.
What's worth your time in TV and movies this weekend? EW's critics review the latest releases: Weird: The Al Yankovic StoryCauseway Blockbuster, and Something in the Dirt.
The wildly ambitious latest from Alejandro González Iñárritu (Birdman, The Revenant) becomes his most personal and brain-bending film yet.
Florence Pugh plays a 19th-century nurse fighting Catholic mysticism with medical facts in Netflix's austere period drama.
Bardos, donkeys, and Belgian heartbreakers mark a fascinating and wildly diverse 2022 slate.
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What's worth your time in TV and movies this weekend? EW's critics review the latest releases: Armageddon TimeAll Quiet on the Western Front, and Louis Armstrong's Black & Blues.
The writer-director missed old-fashioned, unabashedly personal films. So he went and made one, a tender look back at his own New York City youth.
What's worth your time in TV and movies this weekend? EW's critics review the latest releases: The Banshees of InisherinInside Amy SchumerAftersun, My Policeman, Wendell & Wild, and Raymond & Ray.
In honor of her latest book, Our Missing Hearts, the celebrated Little Fires Everywhere author talks to EW about the books, movies, and cartoon animals that shaped her.
On the eve of their new album, the Britpop giants' frontman shares the soundtrack of his life.
They play divorcees bickering their way through Bali in Ol Parker's shiny, anodyne comedy.
Eddie Redmayne and Jessica Chastain play nurses on two sides of the first-do-no-harm coin in 'The Good Nurse,' a cagey, compelling true-life mystery.