UPDATE: Dr. Luke's lawyer releases statement after article is published

By Jessica Goodman
Updated October 26, 2016 at 07:43 PM EDT
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Credit: Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic

UPDATE: Hours after the New York Times Magazine published a profile on Kesha, Dr. Luke’s lawyer released a lengthy statement in response. The release is reprinted below.

EARLIER: Kesha hasn’t debuted new solo music since her 2012 album Warrior, but in a new interview with the New York Times Magazine, the singer previews the 22 new tracks she wrote and recorded at her own expense.

The tracks include “Hunt You Down,” which the Times describes as a “real country song with banjo and some real country sentiments” featuring lyrics like “If you [expletive] around, I’ll hunt you down,” “Learn To Let It Go,” a reportedly radio-ready track, “Rosé,” about lost love, and “Rainbows,” which Kesha says she wrote in rehab.

About “Rainbows,” Kesha says that she wanted to write a track akin to “something that Brian Wilson would have done on Pet Sounds.” Produced by Ben Folds, the song houses lyrics, “I found a rainbow, rainbow, baby. Trust me, I know life is scary, but just put those colors on, girl, and come and paint the world with me tonight.” On it, she’s backed by an orchestra.

Earlier this year, Kesha and Zedd released a remix of his song “True Colors,” featuring her vocals, and she also shared a video of a small new clip of acoustic music back in February as a thank you to fans.

But she has been kept out of the studio largely due to her ongoing legal battle with super producer Dr. Luke. Kesha put out her first two albums Animal and Warrior with Dr. Luke and his Sony imprint Kemosabe records, but since then Kesha has filed lawsuits against Dr. Luke, claiming he drugged, raped, and emotionally abused her. Dr. Luke has denied these claims in court and on social media, and countersued for defamation.

Kesha also asked that her contract be absorbed by RCA, the label that distributes Kemosabe. In April, most of Kesha’s complaints were dismissed, but she is still involved in the ongoing appeal process.

Kesha’s lawyer Daniel M. Petrocelli has spoken about her new music before, and in August, he told EW in a statement that Kesha had “delivered 28 new songs to the record label. We have conveyed to Sony Music and the label Kesha’s strong desire to release her next album and single as soon as possible.”

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