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No matter what else you hear going forward, Larry David will not be going on strike (yeah!). Neither will David Spade (um…yeah?). That’s because the union that covers the casts of David’s Curb Your Enthusiasm and Spade’s CBS comedy Rules of Engagement announced yesterday that a majority of its 70,000-plus members had ratified a new three-year contract with TV and movie studios. This is the first indication that Hollywood actors may not walk off the job, thus sparing the town of its second major work stoppage in a year.

But not everyone is thrilled by the news. The powerful brass of SAG, showbiz’s largest actor’s guild, had tried to dissuade the smaller group, AFTRA, to sign off on a deal that among other improvements, promises pay hikes and residuals for Internet downloads. “We had the moral victory,” declared AFTRA President Roberta Reardon. “We beat off an incredible attack that was extremely well funded and well focused. I’m sure [SAG] will truly spin this to make themselves look glorious.”

Indeed, it only took a couple of minutes for the larger union to do

just that. SAG President Alan Rosenberg released a statement declaring

a different kind of moral victory: After all, more than one-third of

AFTRA’s members had voted against the plan, he maintained. “Clearly,

many SAG members responded to our education and outreach campaign and

voted against the inadequate AFTRA agreement,” Rosenberg said in a

statement. “We knew AFTRA would appeal to its many AFTRA-only members

who are news people, sportscasters, and DJs to pass the tentative

agreement covering acting jobs.”

Rosenberg’s “victory” lap around Hollywood may be a short one,

though. SAG is expected to respond tomorrow (July 10) to the

conglomerates’ “final” proposal, which they claim offers more than $250

million in additional compensation to the actors. And since there are

few people who want to put the entertainment industry through the type

of pain it went through earlier this year when the writers walked off

the job for 100 days, it seems unlikely that Rosenberg will be able to

persuade the necessary 75 percent of SAG’s 120,000 members to vote for

a strike.

Indeed, it only took a couple of minutes for the larger union to dojust that. SAG President Alan Rosenberg released a statement declaringa different kind of moral victory: After all, more than one-third ofAFTRA’s members had voted against the plan, he maintained. “Clearly,many SAG members responded to our education and outreach campaign andvoted against the inadequate AFTRA agreement,” Rosenberg said in astatement. “We knew AFTRA would appeal to its many AFTRA-only memberswho are news people, sportscasters, and DJs to pass the tentativeagreement covering acting jobs.”

Rosenberg’s “victory” lap around Hollywood may be a short one,though. SAG is expected to respond tomorrow (July 10) to theconglomerates’ “final” proposal, which they claim offers more than $250million in additional compensation to the actors. And since there arefew people who want to put the entertainment industry through the typeof pain it went through earlier this year when the writers walked offthe job for 100 days, it seems unlikely that Rosenberg will be able topersuade the necessary 75 percent of SAG’s 120,000 members to vote fora strike.

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