We rate TV shows about journalism -- Is ''Kolchak: The Night Stalker'' more accurate than ''Lois & Clark''

By Jennifer Armstrong
July 28, 2006 at 04:00 AM EDT

We rate TV shows about journalism

Bravo’s new docu-series Tabloid Wars gives the scoop on what really happens behind the scenes at a newspaper. But — stop the presses! — that got us wondering how realistic TV’s scripted journalism-centric shows have been in the past. We rated them on a scale of 1 (supermarket gossip rag material) to 10 (Pulitzer-worthy).

KOLCHAK: THE NIGHT STALKER
(1974-75)
Newspaper reporter Carl Kolchak owned the paranormal beat — think werewolves and zombies. Good for camp, bad for legitimacy.

LOU GRANT
(1977-1982)
Mary Richards’ boss jumped to editing the fictional L.A. Tribune, tackling journalistic issues such as the First Amendment. Still first in our hearts.

LOIS & CLARK
(1993-97)
The assignments included laughable undercover investigations, otherworldly occurrences, and maniacal villains — but one of the reporters was Superman, so we’ll forgive.

INK
(1996-97)
Ted Danson played a columnist and real-life wife Mary Steenburgen played his ex-wife boss. How they put out a paper in between all that flirting is the real question.

DEADLINE
(2000-01)
Oliver Platt headlined as a computer-phobic New York tabloid columnist. His character was a tad cartoonish — but the cynical newsroom banter was spot-on.

Advertisement

Comments



EDIT POST