Franz Ferdinand headlines Glasglow's greatest rock -- EW picks the best undiscovered gems of the Glasglow rock scene
Advertisement

The name of Scotland’s largest city comes from older Gaelic Glas cu, which translates as ”dear green place.” And indeed, the otherwise quiet town has been a verdant source of rock for decades. Below, a rough-guide family tree to the best guitar-wielding Glaswegians, past and present.

OLD SCHOOL

ORANGE JUICE

Rambunctious neo-pop leaders who reigned from 1979 to 1984; still name-checked nonstop. Check out: You Can’t Hide Your Love Forever (1982)

AZTEC CAMERA

A woozy, jazzier kind of pop, led by the bittersweet poet Roddy Frame, though never beyond cult status. Check out: High Land, Hard Rain (1983)

THE BLUE NILE

Cultish (in the U.S., at least) folkers; not much for the rawk, but knew their way around a synth. Check out: Hats (1989)

THE JESUS & MARY CHAIN

The undisputed Scottish champs of Velvet Underground-style jangle and swirl. Check out: Pyschocandy (1985)

MIDDLE SCHOOL

TEENAGE FANCLUB

Reviving Big Star-worthy pop once again at the dawn of the ’90s. Check out: Bandwagonesque (1991)

THE VASELINES

Ramshackle twee-poppers granted worldwide status by dictum of His Holiness (and dedicated fan) Kurt Cobain. Check out: The Way of the Vaselines: A Complete History (1992)

THE PASTELS

More wistful, literate indie pop, led by scene figurehead Stephen Pastel. Check out: Mobile Safari (1995)

NEW-ISH SCHOOL

THE DELGADOS

Widely underappreciated popsters, both shimmery and arch. Check out: The Great Eastern (2000)

MOGWAI

Hypnotic sound-wall spelunkers; put the ”mental” back in instrumental. Check out: Young Team (1997)

BELLE & SEBASTIAN

Scottish poster children for the melancholy picaresque of ’90s indie acoustica; still going strong. Check out: If You’re Feeling Sinister (1996) or The Boy With the Arab Strap (1998)

+ BANDS TO WATCH

Led by the rough-hewn, hard-edged folk rock of SONS AND DAUGHTERS, the new school still thrives. See also: MOTHER AND THE ADDICTS; PARK ATTACK; UNCLE JOHN & WHITELOCK; JAMES ORR COMPLEX.

Comments