Letters from our readers -- Check out the readers who agreed with us, and those who didn't

By EW Staff
August 26, 2005 at 04:00 AM EDT

Put Up Your ‘Dukes’

I was so happy not to see Jessica Simpson on your cover! The boys were a way better choice. Now, if only we could get her off the cover of every other magazine in the universe…
PAM EDWARDS
edwardsp@shaw.ca
Prince George, British Columbia

I just got my issue of EW with Johnny Knoxville and Seann William Scott on the front. Of all the boobs from The Dukes of Hazzard, those aren’t the two I expected to see on your cover.
ANDY FORRESTER
iambigA@msn.com
Durham, N.C.

Are you aficionados of irony? That’s the conclusion I reached after pulling issue No. 833 out of my mailbox. There, right on your cover, you feature the craptacular The Dukes of Hazzard, and on the same cover you declare: ”Why Moviegoers Are Mad — and How to Fix It.” My response? Um, look around.
LORRAINE BERRY
lorraine_berry@yahoo.com
Ithaca, N.Y.

Car Trouble

Chris Nashawaty needs to have his learner’s permit revoked. He puts Chitty Chitty Bang Bang at the top of the list of ”10 Best Cars in Movie History,” then wastes valuable space on James Bond’s made-for-Matchbox submarine Lotus Esprit? Kid stuff! There is no cooler car in movie history than Mad Max‘s Interceptor.
CURTIS GROPP
cgropp@socal.rr.com
Huntington Beach, Calif.

So, according to Chris Nashawaty, ”Goldfinger‘s Aston Martin is a little obvious.” When does being the ”obvious” member of a list (and, I would argue, the most famous car in movie history) mean you don’t get included on a 10-best list? That’s like saying Anthony Perkins is ”obviously” the most famous psycho in film history…and then leaving him off a list of the 10 best psychos of all time! (Plus, the Aston Martin in Goldfinger was driven by Sean Connery, the best James Bond of all time!)
STEVE BRANT
trimtab@sprynet.com
Bryn Mawr, Pa.

Movie Madness

Thanks for the state-of-the-movies story (”You’re Mad as Hell and You’re Not Going to Take It Anymore”). The bill of rights is great; however, I doubt that the parents who brought their 4-year-old to a documentary about penguins marching (it’s rated G, so it must be suitable!) or the middle-aged woman who talked through the entire movie are hip enough to read EW or apply it to their own lives. It’s called courtesy, people.
LISA FEDOROV
wombatlove@gmail.com
Keller, Tex.

Why are moviegoers mad? Movies based on crappy old TV shows or comic books? Another bad remake? To reverse the current box office trend, studios should invest in some creative, original scripts. If I want reruns, I’ll watch Nick at Nite.
BOB SATNAN
azbobdog@yahoo.com
Mesa, Ariz.

I read your article about the decline of the moviegoing experience. One place to lay blame is with the multiplexes, especially those outside of urban areas. It’s my impression that when a ”big” movie is released, the multiplex will use half or three-quarters of their theaters for that one show, so unless that is the movie you want to see the options are pretty slim. The multiplexes also tend not to show the smaller films until there is significant buzz generated about them — meaning that in a lot of cases they don’t show them at all; unless you live in a major city the only opportunity to see these films is when they come out on DVD. I have not been to a movie in the theater since February, and sadly, I’ve seen nothing of late that would make me want to go any time soon.
SUZANNE WEINER
poohsuz@yahoo.com
Lake in the Hills, Ill.

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