EW talks with Heather Locklear -- The former ''Melrose Place'' star tells us about her new movie ''The Perfect Man''

By Nicholas Fonseca
Updated June 17, 2005 at 04:00 AM EDT

The Perfect Man

type
  • Movie
genre

”I’m lying in bed right now,” purrs Heather Locklear, calling from a hotel room in L.A. ”And I wanna ask you something: Do I have to go home tonight?” The 43-year-old actress just finished a press junket for The Perfect Man (out June 17) — in which she plays a lovelorn pastry chef whose daughter (Hilary Duff) creates a wily plan to find the man of Mom’s dreams — and all she wants is sleep. ”I’m exhausted. I haven’t seen my family in two days, and they’re here in L.A.! Won’t I be worthless? I want to zone out. But enough about me.” Oh, please, Heather, keep going!

Are we supposed to believe that a single mom who looks like you would take the first nice guy who comes along?

Well. . .getting older and seeing her daughter growing up and being beautiful and having her own relationships. . .it puts reality right up in her face. She now knows that she needs to settle. And that’s not always a fun thing to do. Knowing that she’s made mistakes and ignored them has made her desperate.

There’s a fun scene in which you attend a concert by an abysmal Styx cover band. Did you try to get your husband [Richie Sambora] and his band, Bon Jovi, to perform instead?

It could have been really funny, but it would have broken the fourth wall. And you have to be ready to poke fun at yourself. They’re not ready.

Your own daughter, Ava, is 7. Did the movie give you any early strategies for coping with her teen years?

Kids are crazy in their teens, and you have to guide them because your actions are usually copied by your child.

And how does Dad feel about this?

He says she’s going to be the prettiest nun in the convent! I’ll just leave the room and let him deal. Who knows? He might end up driving them to their date and joining in for the entire evening.

Episode Recaps

The Perfect Man

type
  • Movie
genre
mpaa
  • PG
runtime
  • 100 minutes
director
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