Who's getting It, who's got It, and who's lost It. We look at celebs from Robin Tunney to guys named David to see if they have what It takes

By Scott Brown
June 20, 2002 at 04:00 AM EDT
Robin Tunney Photograph by Alison Dyer
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Getting It
AND
With all due respect to Tina and Jimmy, the ”Even Stevens” of ”The Daily Show With Jon Stewart” remain the most consistently funny mock-news duo on TV. Separately, their ”Dateline”-skewering ”reports” provide gleefully misanthropic counterpoint to Stewart’s genial goofing. Together — especially in their ”Crossfire”-esque debates — they’re more than the human rib cage can withstand.

”Boston Public” and ”Boiler Room” only hinted at Katt’s potential: His well-honed alpha-jerk persona is put to spectacular use in Steven Soderbergh’s ”Full Frontal” (August), where he steals scenes as a small-time, egomaniacal stage actor searching for his not-so-elusive inner Hitler.

No longer ”that girl from ‘The Craft’ who’s not Neve Campbell or Fairuza Balk,” Tunney sets herself apart from the coven as a neurotic stalking victim boxed in by electronic house arrest in the creepy-sexy ”Cherish.”

, OF IFC FILMS
”Go Tigers!” ”The Business of Strangers.” ”Y Tu Mamá También.” All in the last nine months. Berney and two-year-old IFC present an interesting rebuttal to the Miramax carpet-bomb strategy: What if all of the films on your slate were good?

Here’s an indicator of instant Itness: Denzel Washington picks you to star in his directorial debut, ”Antwone Fisher” (December). Luke — who’d only guested on sitcoms — was working at the Sony lot gift shop when he got the role.

It’s not just footage of old Nazi parades anymore. When Tony Soprano and Ozzy Osbourne tune in, maybe you should too.

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  • Movie
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mpaa
  • PG
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  • 120 minutes
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