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By Gary Susman
October 11, 2001 at 04:00 AM EDT
N Sync: Evan Agostini/Image Direct

D.C. BIPARTISANSHIP The latest big benefit concert to be announced is ”United We Stand,” on October 21, and you know they’re not kidding about that title if both ‘N Sync and Backstreet Boys are going to perform at the same show. Other performers at the eight-hour show, at Washington, D.C.’s RFK Stadium, will be Michael Jackson, Aerosmith, James Brown, Mick Jagger, Kiss, Ricky Martin, Al Green, Carlos Santana, Bon Jovi, matchbox twenty, Aaron Carter, and the Goo Goo Dolls.

In an interview taped for Monday’s ”Total Request Live” on MTV, ‘N Sync‘s Lance Bass also named Bruce Springsteen, and Britney Spears as participants, but it turns out that Spears will be stuck rehearsing for her fall tour on that date, and Springsteen hasn’t confirmed his appearance. Jagger, Bon Jovi, and the Goo Goo Dolls are also among those scheduled to play the night before at The Concert For New York, the benefit headlined by Paul McCartney at Madison Square Garden. It would certainly be great to see Jackson and Jagger together — ”State of Shock” sounds very apt these days.

TUBE TALK Officials from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences said yesterday that they may not come to a decision until the end of the week on whether to reschedule the Emmys for the third time. ”Obviously people want the awards to be given out,” ATAS president Jim Chabin told Reuters. ”Whether that’s a private dinner or a press conference or something else, I think there seems to be some sort of ritual and ceremony where we honor these people for their achievements.”

If there is a third attempt at an Emmy ceremony, it almost certainly won’t be a show before a packed crowd at the Shrine Auditiorium, ATAS chairman and CEO Bryce Zabel told the Hollywood Reporter. ”We all realize that the idea of a live audience at the Shrine is probably not viable any longer,” he said. ”On the other hand, CBS still wants to put something on, and we still want to give out the Emmys. Within that framework, there are a lot of alternatives.”

The producer of one nominated series is itching for the show to go on. ”Malcolm in the Middle”’s Linwood Boomer, who was one of the few Emmy participants on Sunday who didn’t think that Sunday’s news of military strikes against Afghanistan necessarily had to pre-empt the awards telecast, told the AP yesterday that TV stars shouldn’t be squeamish about reuniting for an Emmy broadcast. Boomer called the idea that terrorists would care enough to target the Emmys ”just ludicrous on the face of it. But trying to fight self-importance in Hollywood is a lost cause.”…

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