By Charles Winecoff
Updated October 22, 1999 at 04:00 AM EDT

”Bad taste is more apparent here than in any other part of the country,” the aesthete Vincent Price observed of Hollywood in 1938, the year he was touted as Universal’s handsome It Man.

But the St. Louis-born art collector who got sidetracked into acting (Laura, The Tingler, The Fly) preferred character parts, eventually becoming known for horror films. This affecting memoir by his daughter reveals how he forever struggled with his nagging artistic ideals. Victoria Price doesn’t shy away from discussing his boyhood anti-Semitism, his anti-Communist oath during the Red Scare, his sexuality, or his odd subservience to women like third wife Coral Browne, the stepmother she describes as ”a cross between a British Auntie Mame and Cruella DeVil.” B

Advertisement

Comments