Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Mark Fuhrman, and Sharon Stone made news this week

By Alexandra Jacobs and Matthew Flamm
Updated August 08, 1997 at 04:00 AM EDT
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CAMELOT CANAPES Still bitterly ruing the thousands you dropped at auction on Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’ coasters? Spring back into hostess mode by fall ’98 with the forthcoming cookbook from longtime Jackie chef Marta Sgubin, which will include never-before-seen snapshots of the Kennedy family, as well as descriptions of the original family and high-society events at which meals were served. ”It’s going to be recipes that were Jackie’s favorites when she entertained,” promises Scribner editor and publisher Lisa Drew, who paid $1 million for the book, according to a source.

LIFE WITHOUT O.J. Mark Fuhrman, the controversial former LAPD detective, is currently wooing New York publishers with a hush-hush project, Murder in Greenwich. Fuhrman wants to reinvestigate the unsolved 1975 killing of Martha Moxley, whose body was found near the Greenwich, Conn., home of Tommy Skakel, nephew of Ethel Kennedy, ”with the hope of proving who did it,” says a publishing insider, adding that Dominick Dunne, who novelized the murder in A Season in Purgatory, might write an intro. Lucianne Goldberg, Fuhrman’s agent, won’t comment on the project but says publishers have been receptive to the ex-cop, whose last book — Murder in Brentwood — was shunned by mainstream publishers and became a Regnery best-seller.

BEAUTY AND THE BEASTS It’s easy enough to picture Sharon Stone appearing in a book called Tall Blondes — but writing a blurb for it? She’s a natural — so long as the tome in question is by ABC correspondent Lynn Sherr and features not the gams of gorgeous girls but rather those of…giraffes. Sherr, who first developed a fondness for the long-lashed, golden beasts during a 1973 safari, mentioned her pet project to the actress during a 20/20 tete-a-tete. Turned out the two women — both tall and flaxen-haired themselves — had another thing in common. Stone’s passion for giraffes went so far back, she’d devoted her high school senior paper to them. After Sherr followed up, Stone bypassed her own skeptical flack and cell-phoned in a flowery blurb for the book — ”Legs akimbo, a disproportionate appetite, mane going all the wrong ways…” Blondes will step out in October from Andrews & McMeel.

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