Howard Stern's ''Private Parts'' -- The radio shock-jock talks about the movie version of his autobiography

By Owen Gleiberman
Updated December 13, 1996 at 05:00 AM EST
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”A lot of people know what I do on the radio,” says Howard Stern, 42. ”What they haven’t seen is me off the air. That’s what Private Parts is about.” Based on Stern’s rebel-yell autobiography, which topped the New York Times best-seller list in 1993, the new movie (it’s due out in March), produced by Ivan Reitman (Ghostbusters) and directed by Betty Thomas (The Brady Bunch Movie), traces Howard’s coming of age on Long Island (think Annie Hall meets the Ramones), his marriage to the ever-devoted Alison (Murder One‘s Mary McCormack), his blitzkrieg wars with radio-station managers, and his transformation, beginning in the mid-’70s, from third-rate disc jockey to shock-jock antihero. (Did we mention that it’s also about lesbians?) For newcomers, the real shock may be that Howard Stern is human after all. ”Private Parts has lots of laughs, and lots of crudity, if you will,” he notes. ”But it’s not a Saturday Night Live movie. It feels real to me.”

Private Parts

type
  • Book
genre
author
  • Howard Stern
publisher
  • Random House

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