Rupert Everett is "Ready to Wear" -- The model-turned-actor tries on film's fashion world for size

By Lawrence O'Toole
Updated December 23, 1994 at 05:00 AM EST

Ready To Wear

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Often confused with fellow Brit actors Hugh Grant (there’s a resemblance) and Rupert Graves (guess why), Rupert Everett is not ”the charming one.” He’s the one with the rep.

Known for his bad-boy image (there have been various reports that he used drugs and hustled in the past), Everett, holding court in a suite at the Waldorf-Astoria during a visit to New York City earlier this month, has mellowed some over the years. ”It’s a function of age, mostly. I don’t have enough energy to be out all night. If you want to work, you need to maintain that energy,” he says, leaning forth his six-foot-plus gym-sculpted body, twinkling those astonishingly vibrant eyes, and laughing. His gigolo good looks certainly serve him well as a fashion designer’s randy son in Robert Altman’s Ready to Wear (Prêt-á-Porter), a decade after he scorched the screen as a homosexual spy in Another Country.

The 35-year-old openly gay actor is also a novelist (1992’s Hello Darling, Are You Working?), with a new book (a thriller called The Hairdressers of St. Tropez) due out in March. ”Actors owe it to their work to invent more in their lives,” he says. ”If they don’t, they don’t know anything to tell anybody.” And, he says, actors need to bring back danger. ”The great actors in America are the ones who haven’t really made it, such as Eric Roberts and Sean Penn. The Costners and the Branaghs are the corporate bores staring at us with dead eyes.”

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Once a runway model himself, Everett loves Altman’s take on the fashion world. ”The film is about ready-to-wear character,” he says. ”In a couple of months anybody can become a he-man or a twig-woman. You can plug into a million different lifestyles and looks. A personality is now a belt or a pair of shoes. It’s scary.”

Ready To Wear

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