By Heather Keets
Updated November 25, 1994 at 05:00 AM EST
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B-Boy Blues

type
  • Book
genre

The premise of B-Boy Blues, James Earl Hardy’s first novel, may be old — it feels so good to be loved so bad — but not since Terry McMillan’s Disappearing Acts has this theme been so well executed. Mitchell Crawford, a journalist, falls for a roughneck bike messenger, Raheim Rivers, and they commence a relationship that is at once passionate and abusive. It’s unfortunate that in his attempt to tell a sexy story, Hardy loses some of the romance. But other themes, such as gay pride and prejudice, are smartly worked into the narrative. Hardy explores what motivates Mitchell, who is African-American and homosexual, in a society where it can be difficult at times to be either, let alone both. A-

B-Boy Blues

type
  • Book
genre
author
  • James Earl Hardy

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