About Your Privacy on this Site
Welcome! To bring you the best content on our sites and applications, Meredith partners with third party advertisers to serve digital ads, including personalized digital ads. Those advertisers use tracking technologies to collect information about your activity on our sites and applications and across the Internet and your other apps and devices.
You always have the choice to experience our sites without personalized advertising based on your web browsing activity by visiting the DAA’s Consumer Choice page, the NAI's website, and/or the EU online choices page, from each of your browsers or devices. To avoid personalized advertising based on your mobile app activity, you can install the DAA’s AppChoices app here. You can find much more information about your privacy choices in our privacy policy. Even if you choose not to have your activity tracked by third parties for advertising services, you will still see non-personalized ads on our sites and applications. By clicking continue below and using our sites or applications, you agree that we and our third party advertisers can:
  • transfer your data to the United States or other countries; and
  • process and share your data so that we and third parties may serve you with personalized ads, subject to your choices as described above and in our privacy policy.
Entertainment Weekly

Exclusive

Sharp Objects first look: Amy Adams, Patricia Clarkson bring Gillian Flynn's debut novel to life

Anne Marie Fox/HBO

Posted on

A version of this story appears in the First Look issue of Entertainment Weekly, on newsstands Friday. For more exclusive interviews and First Look photos only in EW, buy it here or subscribe now.

Camille and her mother, Adora — the women at the center of Gillian Flynn’s 2006 debut novel, Sharp Objects — have a relationship so toxic they should be reported to poison control.

In the eight-episode adaptation developed by Marti Noxon (UnREAL) and directed by Jean-Marc Vallée (Big Little Lies, Wild), their venomous connection only grows more potent when Camille (Amy Adams, also an executive producer), a crime reporter fresh out of a psych hospital for her years of self-harm, returns to her hometown of Wind Gap, Mo., to investigate the murders of two little girls. The assignment lands her back in her childhood home under the critical eye of picture-perfect small-town socialite Adora (Patricia Clarkson), which forces Camille to confront personal demons, including spoiled half sister Amma, played by Eliza Scanlen.

Anne Marie Fox/HBO

Like Flynn’s other novels, Dark Places and Gone Girl — which have both been adapted into filmsSharp Objects has no shortage of disturbing twists, but the author and EP says this book most needed the extra TV screen time. “I was really nervous it would just turn into a horror movie and lose a lot of the nuance,” she explains. “The mystery is as much about who Camille is and what happened in this town as it is about the murders.”

Diving into the unsettling world of Wind Gap hasn’t been easy on the actors, either. “I think it’s been a burden for [Amy] to carry that character,” Noxon admits. The same goes for Clarkson, who calls Adora “the beauty and the beast,” before adding, “It’s a very brutal part and one that can take a toll on you.” Like mother, like daughter — off camera, at least.

Sharp Objects debuts on HBO summer 2018.

Additional reporting by Nicole Sperling

Outbrain

Tags