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''Weeds'': Nancy makes the big move

On ”Weeds,” after handling Marvin and the Mexican competition by handing over U-Turn’s trunk, Nancy settles her flirtation with Sullivan by dropping her drawers

Posted on

Mark Seliger

Weeds

type:
TV Show
Current Status:
In Season
run date:
08/08/05
performer:
Mary-Louise Parker, Justin Kirk, Kevin Nealon, Elizabeth Perkins
genre:
Comedy

”Weeds”: Nancy makes the big move

Sigmund Freud suggested that humans are driven by two impulses: the desire to procreate (eros) and the desire to flirt with death (thanatos). While I’m not sure that I agree with his theory, there’s no denying that this episode of Weeds would’ve thrilled the professorial wool vest off the sex-obsessed psychoanalyst. And I’m not just talking about Andy’s goofy foray into the world of porn.

It started out at U-Turn’s blingy funeral, where the late gangsta’s muscular corpse was displayed in a hot tub — an especially awesome touch from a show clearly committed to one-upping the ways it has thumbed its nose at anything sacred. And what hot-tub-themed funeral would be complete without the resident hot-pantsed sex offender, Clinique? Am I the only one who totally did not see this pregnancy thing coming? As horrified as I was when she violated Sanjay (off screen, thank the Lord for small mercies), I can’t deny that there’s serious comedy to be mined from this love connection. For example, what will they name the tyke? The possibilities boggle the mind!

Over in adolescence-ville, former stallion Silas isn’t getting any from new girlfriend Tara (Mary-Kate Olsen). And am I stuck in an alternate universe? ‘Cause the teen boy seems okay with it. As for Shane, he’s evolved from embracing his love of self-love into trying to get his frisky hands on a real-life crush. Yes, our little boy is growing up! It’s a shame, then, that his dream was deferred by the decidedly hornier Isabelle, who had her own lesbian designs on said lass. (That delightful sneak really does have some of her mom’s genes in her, doesn’t she?) Not that I want to see all the good kids go bad, but I’m sort of hoping this upset might prompt Shane to rebel at home. I mean, aren’t we counting the hours until Nancy’s bad parenting skills come back to bite her on her well-toned butt?

While we’re on the topic of Nancy’s assets, it appears that she’s really got a knack for using her feminine wiles to conduct business. After a quiet confrontation, she finally prompted Conrad to show a little tenderness and also coyly confess his and Heylia’s involvement in Marvin’s shooting. But intriguingly, it was Nancy who actually zeroed out the debt. She proved a rock-star negotiator during that ”gang summit” with the Tres Seis by using both the gun pointed at Marvin’s head and the heroin in her house as leverage. Guillermo’s sexy kiss was further evidence of Nancy’s power of MILF — and its ability to trounce Marvin’s feckless street posturing. Score one for the yuppies.

It’s satisfying to know that our girl’s more clever than we give her credit for; I just pray this doesn’t mean our alternately spacey and caffeine-jittery heroine is inching towards the Dark Side. For instance, do we honestly think she’ll follow Guillermo’s order not to deal mota anymore? (See how I did that? Weeds is educational, man.) She flaunted her new chutzpah-liberation when she seduced the sleazy-to-a-T Sullivan — who’s still the object of Doug’s wrath and Celia’s desire — at the end of the episode. In a word, ”ick.” With that indiscretion, it’s only fitting that the Freudian sex-death laws evened the playing field with the emergence of what appears to be DEA hubby Peter’s body. Y’all remember him, right?

So, is this the last Nancy will see of the Tres Seis? Is it too late for her to spark a bigger romance with Conrad? Does the government actually have a case against her? Last, which was your favorite new word for heroin: chiva, tigre, or chapapote?

This week the theme song, ”Little Boxes,” was covered by the Individuals. On a scale of 1 to 10, I give it a 9 (if it was an intentional rap parody) or a 4.5 (if not).