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The Returned recap: Peter

Like Helen promised, bad things are happening.

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Joseph Lederer/A&E

The Returned (A+E)

type:
TV Show
Current Status:
In Season
seasons:
1
run date:
03/09/15
genre:
Drama

Last week we found out Peter was also a Returned, and this episode begins with a scene from 29 years ago explaining how Peter died—and it’s not particularly exciting: He and Rich, the guy who killed Victor, get in a scuffle that ends in Rich accidentally (maybe?) shooting Peter dead.

Back in the present, Tommy’s more suspicious of Peter than ever. And so he does what any rational, professional cop would do with someone they’re suspicious of: Tommy arrests Peter.

PETER

Now that Tommy’s arrested him, Peter’s hanging out in jail, where Claire comes to get some answers. She threatens to leave if he doesn’t immediately tell her who he is, but her fury comes off as a bit out of place—her daughter is just like him. Why’s she suddenly acting so indignant? She’s seen how the people have been treating Camille since they found out about her, so I’d think she’d understand why Peter has kept this fun fact about him a secret. But apparently not.

He tells her his name was Andrew, and that he died in the flood (ugh, Peter, why did you have to lie?). “I just wanted to be the guy you thought I was,” he says when she asks why he never told her. This doesn’t make anything better though: She thinks he’s been hiding behind Camille, and she feels betrayed. Oh, Claire, always making everything about you.

Later on, a journalist from Chicago stops by his cell because she heard he and Camille have something in common. He says he doesn’t have a story to tell her, then she names some places. “All of them reported seeing people rise from the dead,” she tells him. And, apparently, all these places—and the people in them—suddenly ceased to exist one day. Caldwell isn’t alone.

JULIE

Julie, who’s been on Victor’s side for no real reason ever since she found him, is finally mad at Victor for what he did to Nikki. Nikki, thank goodness, is okay after the nasty staircase fall though—well, mostly: She has a broken wrist and a concussion.

After Julie makes sure Nikki is going to be fine, she goes into the car with Victor and tries to interrogate him about who else he’s hurt. He doesn’t reply and just wears a creepy closed-mouth smile the entire time she angrily asks him questions. He also is very focused on turning the radio on, which she keeps turning off. Her results are futile though: Victor can turn on the radio with his mind—just like he caused Tony to go crazy and Nikki to fall with his mind. What do we think his IQ is?

Julie and Victor go to the house where he was killed, and she realizes something bad happened to him there. But despite the sympathy she might have for him, she can’t help him anymore. “The truth is, your mom isn’t coming back and the fairy doesn’t exist.” She tells him this gently, as if she’s speaking to a little child. And although Victor looks like a child, it’s clear that his mind is much more advanced.

Victor argues with her (yes, verbally), but she doesn’t budge: She’s breaking up with him. Their relationship has always been strange—he hasn’t spoken to her at all—but this “break-up” makes it even stranger. “I love you, and I’m so grateful that we met, but we can’t be together anymore,” she tells him. Watching a grown woman say “we can’t be together anymore” to a kid is undeniably weird.

As punishment, a hooded man chokes her as she has quick flashbacks of the tunnel attack. The man eventually disappears though, and she finds herself completely alone in the room where Victor was killed. At this point, I’m wondering if Victor is just really, really fast or if he has teleportation powers (wouldn’t put that past him at this point, honestly).

Julie returns to the hospital, where she tells Nikki “it’s over” (again with the romantic break-up language!) before they make out in the hospital hallway. Things are okay for them—for now.

NEXT: Helen’s got the dynamite.