ABC/Giovanni Rufino
Sage Young
May 16, 2016 AT 04:40 AM EDT

If it weren’t for Ben’s flame out — if that’s what it was — then that one moment of carelessness and tragically misplaced trust wouldn’t have defined Adam’s entire life. After seeing the bunker, Claire comes to the conclusion that no whole human being could have walked out of there after a decade. “For 10 years, he was kept in a dirty cage like an animal,” she tells Willa. “It’s not his fault that he became one.” But Ben is already gone; he gave the $10,000 back in an envelope labeled with Willa’s name in big, childlike print.

Ben’s departure was a given after his confession to his surrogate big brother. He happens upon Danny being typically productive, i.e. playing online poker on a laptop that probably belongs to another Warren. Danny teaches Ben about hedging your bets and about how making assumptions on what your opponents have is in your best interest. With Claire missing and the cops closing in on Doug, the impostor plays his hand: “My name is Ben.” And I bet Danny has never wished so hard that his cynical instincts had been wrong.

Willa and Claire are 10 steps ahead of the men in the family in terms of processing Ben’s presence in their lives. (Reminder: John still doesn’t know.) Finally, they come around to considering him as a child — a child living under the shadow of an extended trauma. The women drive out into the night and find him hitchhiking in the rain. “Come home,” Claire beckons, and Ben complies.

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Willa goes out again to bring her other brother home, but that trip is less successful. She sits next to Danny on a barstool, and all their sibling bonding from the last episode is a vodka-drunk memory. She was going to tell him, Willa says, but quickly admits that’s not true. Danny can’t even look her in the face. She asks him to punish her with a rope burn like he did the time she broke his Optimus Prime. “At least it made it okay again,” she says. “I love you.” He tells her to close her eyes, but Danny doesn’t think that Willa deserves the distraction of physical pain. He slips away, and she deflates.

Danny seems to have given up on his family, but Det. Meyer won’t do the same to Clements. A uniform plays her a recording of the decoy voicemail he left for his husband, but her instincts won’t let her believe that her partner is really on a bender. The only solution for the stumped detective is day-drinking, and that’s how Meyer finds herself in an empty bar that’s open early enough to treat its patrons to some morning talk shows. Inspiration can come from mysterious places; in this case, Clements’ life is saved by Michelle Collins and Joy Behar on The View. Somehow Meyer hadn’t considered yet that Doug might be keeping the agent underground, even though that’s his whole M.O. Anyway, she heads out to the area where the soil matches the sample she picked up from Doug’s boot tracks last week and is questioning a neighbor when she hears a shot.

Jane had told Clements that Doug was taking her and their baby away to Canada and that she’d call in a tip as soon as they were safely away. Thanks but no thanks, Clements says. He’ll be long gone by then. He still can’t understand why she’d continue her life with someone with a history like Doug’s, but Jane is by no means sticking around to go to jail. “I have a baby to protect,” she explains. “Kids become their parents, Jane,” Clements responds. If she goes through with this, she is protecting herself and dooming her child

NEXT: Poetic justice

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