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'Scream' recap: 'Hello, Emma'

Rachel’s murder is made to look like a suicide, but that’s the least of Emma’s problems.

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Eric Liebowitz/NBC

Scream

type:
TV Show
Current Status:
In Season
seasons:
1
performer:
Willa Fitzgerald, Bex Taylor-Klaus, Carlson Young
broadcaster:
MTV
genre:
Crime, Horror, Mystery

MTV might actually be doing the seemingly impossible: It’s turning successful films into shows that aren’t totally terrible. As a Teen Wolf enthusiast (I would literally shout my love for that crazy show from the rooftops), I’ve been hoping for months that Scream would be a great fit with Teen Wolf and the MTV scripted series canon in general. And while the pilot was a mediocre start to an interesting concept, the second episode is arguably much better. However it also presents darker story lines than the pilot, so those looking for the constant meta humor and winking overtones should be in for a bit of an awakening.

For the second time, we get a twist on the iconic “what’s your favorite scary movie” phone call from the Scream films. But it’s the second of two phone calls, the first of which begins and ends in tragedy. The series didn’t shy away from Audrey’s love interest, Rachel, dealing with real problems that many high schoolers (and adults) have regarding self-love and self-worth. After reading several horrible comments about herself under the video posted of her and Audrey’s makeout (the video has already been taken down as Noah tells Audrey in the pilot), Rachel takes out a razor blade and starts to cut herself when her phone rings. She answers after seeing Audrey’s name but when she believes Audrey is asking her to go to their “special place” on the balcony, Rachel finds a noose that the killer immediately uses on Rachel herself. And bam! Scream the series gets its second murder.

Episode 2 brings a new character to Lakewood and to the potential body pileup that is bound to occur by the end of the season. Piper Shaw is a Sarah Koenig-esque journalist who hosts a true crime podcast that is all the rage among the Lakewood folk, but her presence really brings another facet of the Scream film franchise to the TV series. Here we finally have the entrance of our very own Gale Weathers.

Emma meanwhile finally confronts Brooke for not telling her of her boyfriend’s infidelity sooner, and rightfully so. Brooke blames her secret keeping on being afraid of Nina, and Emma shrugs it off much more quickly than she probably should. But since Brooke’s reveal comes so quickly after Nina’s death, does that mean the presumed new Queen B planned her predecessor’s downfall? It’s not likely since she’s got her own problem to deal with, mainly still being hot for teach and vice versa. I don’t know what it is about these high school-set shows that makes all the characters who hook up with their teacher so ridiculously bad at it, but they are. Come on Scream writers, take a page from Pretty Little Liars and at least pretend to to hide the romantic comments and lustful looks between Brooke and Mr. Branson.

Noah gets taken to Sheriff Hudson’s office for questioning and it turns out, Noah has done more than just research Brandon James—he even exchanged emails with Brandon’s brother and tried to uncover the identity of the girl with whom Brandon was obsessed. Hudson, who knows the truth, asks Noah if he figured it out, to which Noah replies that none of his theories panned out. I still can’t decide if I believe him or not.

And of course despite all the bloodshed happening in their town, the only thing Will and Jake seem to care about is women. Will is desperate to get Emma back and for some reason needs her to be in the stands at his basketball game when the scouts are scheduled to make an appearance. Is she his good luck charm? Does showing that Will has a life outside of basketball appeal to scouts? I can’t fully understand why he’s so adamant about Emma’s presence at the game. Jake tells him not to worry about anything, quoting some kind of stoner manual to get “zen” with everything. When Will brings up their creepy web footage of Nina, Jake says they are officially closed for business (he actually says “bidness” which makes what Noah does to his car all the more satisfying). But clearly Jake is a liar and presumably they (or at the very least Jake) were doing more than just spying on Nina through her webcam. It’s creepy stuff, I don’t like this story line one bit. Will tries to explain his tryst with Nina by blaming the victims (a.k.a. both women), which rightly rubs Emma the wrong way, but that’s not his last attempt at getting back in her good graces.

NEXT: Noah Gets Lucky

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