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Bates Motel recap: Til Death Do You Part

Norma and Romero tie the knot, and Norman realizes therapy is definitely not for him

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Cate Cameron/A&E

Bates Motel

type:
TV Show
genre:
Mystery and Thriller
run date:
03/18/13
performer:
Vera Farmiga, Freddie Highmore
broadcaster:
A&E
seasons:
5
Current Status:
In Season
tvpgr:
TV-MA

You thought we had to wait two months for a Bates wedding? Not in White Pine Bay.

Although we open on a clearly guilty Norma staring at Norman’s empty bed and feeling upset about what she’s done, we quickly cut to her meeting Romero at City Hall for their wedding. It’s kind of hysterically awkward — neither of them know what to do. They are clearly not comfortable being intimate, despite their underlying feelings. Norma’s so intent on rushing the wedding that she completely forgets she even needs a ring (fortunately, Romero has her covered, in a super sweet moment).

And then, the moment we’ve all been waiting for: Romero and Norma kiss. And no, this isn’t a dream, or one of those “almost” moments that have happened over the past four seasons. It’s a real, long kiss. It’s a moment that’s been built up for a long time, and man, does Romero go for it, catching Norma off guard with how passionate he is. And he’s so into making this believable that I can’t not think there’s not real passion there. It makes me sad when I realize I already know how this series will eventually end, because I just want Romero and Norma to be happy together.

Romero assures her she’s doing the right thing with Norman, and, well, let’s hope. Norman is currently getting a tour of Pineview from a nice woman trying to give him his orientation. Norman’s not interested in yoga or tours, though. He wants to know how long he’ll be there, and he’s told that’s up to Dr. Edwards. Edwards asks Norman if he’s been in therapy before, and Norman’s actually pretty honest about his therapy history…but he also noted that his mother had problems and “that took precedence.” He didn’t like going. And he thinks therapy is silly, anyway. He doesn’t want to be in therapy because he still believes he’s there only because Norma put him there, and he’s STILL obsessed with Norma being the ultimate problem. Dr. Edwards really has his work cut out for him. I hope they give him a pay raise rather than a knife to the throat.

Norma calls Pineview and finds out she can’t speak to or see Norman for 72 hours, which no one told her. Romero arrives with his stuff (“I’m gonna need a key”) and while Norma is hesitant to have him move in, Romero tells her it has to look real. She needs to commit to this. And he’s a public figure, after all, which means word will get around town soon enough. But Norma’s freaked out about Romero being in the house, and Romero tries to make things less awkward by offering that they go out to dinner. His friend, who heard that he got married, offered him a table at a swanky restaurant and dinner’s on the house. “This is the third time I’ve been married, and I’m never going to be good at it,” Norma tells her new husband bluntly. Romero, for his part, seems unaffected by this drop of information.

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They do end up going to dinner and after a few glasses of wine, Norma loosens up. “Alcohol makes it all so much easier,” says Romero, speaking the truth. “I can see you’re going to be a great influence,” Norma responds, also speaking the truth. This is actually Romero’s second time being married, since he was married while he was in the Marines. Norma opens up a little more about her history, and very candidly, too — in fact, this is probably the most open Norma’s been about her life without being on edge. The emotional moment is dashed when Norma asks who he sleeps with, because she want to know… I mean, they’re just “married,” they’re not really married. (Not that Romero will tell.) The night ends with Romero bringing a tipsy Norma home and THIS is the relationship and show that I want from these two. He tucks her into bed and jokingly says “goodnight, Mrs. Romero,” to which Norma yells, “I’m keeping my name!” Who says feminism isn’t alive and well?

NEXT: May you always be satisfied

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