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Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. recap: Paradise Lost

Hive shows his true colors, and the Secret Warriors are called to the stage

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Kelsey McNeal/ABC

Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

type:
TV Show
Current Status:
In Season
tvpgr:
TV-PG
seasons:
4
run date:
07/19/13
performer:
Clark Gregg, Ming-Na Wen, Chloe Bennet
broadcaster:
ABC
genre:
ActionAdventure

It’s about damn time that we got an episode focused on Hive, and more specifically, an episode that focused on why we should be scared of this Inhuman monster. Sure, Hive LOOKS terrifying. And Brett Dalton is doing some awesome vocal work in making the character different even though he looks like Grant Ward still. And we’ve seen him be ruthless with his powers. But in this world of Inhumans, there are a lot of people who have crazy powers. So what’s Hive’s deal?

To understand, we need to flash back to the 1970s, and to a young Gideon Malick (Cameron Palatas) and his brother, Nathaniel (Joel Dabney Courtney), after the loss of their father. Nathaniel interrupts Malick’s mourning by telling him Daniel Whitehall want to see him — you remember Whitehall, right? The man responsible for searching for the obelisk? But Malick has no interest in Whitehall because apparently he believed in a different kind of Hydra that their dad was against. You don’t ignore Whitehall, though, so off they go. Whitehall attempts to persuade them to choose his path in following Hydra — the scientific path rather than the one Malick is intent on following, which involves the whole stone ritual of sending people through the obelisk to try to find the Inhuman monster. Malick still is hesitant, even when Whitehall suggests that his father may have not as been as brave and strong a Hydra leader as he’s always believed in. Now, who does he REALLY want to follow?

A present-day Gideon Malick comes home to the same old house and meets his daughter, Stephanie — who greets him by saying she hadn’t known their guest was so tall, dark and handsome. A worried Malick realizes Hive has already arrived, and Stephanie confirms he showed up earlier, asking to gather the Inner Circle. Why? Hive thinks it’s time to reveal his true self. Stephanie realizes something’s up with her father, who is less confident than usual, and Malick tells her that he saw his death (remember, Charles the Inhuman touched him in the last episode). And it was a bad death. Because his killer? None other than Hive. Hive and Hydra have certainly worked their magic on Stephanie, however, who is convinced that he’s not going to hurt her. But Malick thinks he’s going to be killed tonight, which is why he’s gathering the others. Stephanie reminds him that he can fix whatever he’s worried about and turn the tables. After all, he can remind them of how important he is. He did show her how to be a strong example of Hydra, after all.

At base, Coulson is looking at a surveillance feed of Hive while May is trying to figure out how the hell he’s still alive. (Hey, MAY still wants to kill Ward.) Daisy, recovered from last week’s vision mishap, shares an adorable moment reuniting with recently returned Mack while Simmons tells the group that she thinks Ward’s body is possessed by “It” from the other planet. They figure “It” has Ward’s memories, but they can’t figure out his intent since he’s not coming after them and he easily could. Fitz, Simmons, and Coulson examine a feed of organisms that eat living flesh, which leads Simmons to wonder what if whatever this monster is uses the organisms to reanimate dead flesh?

Coulson calls everyone in and says if they can figure out what Malick wanted from Transia, it can hopefully lead them to Hive. Lincoln admits there’s an Inhuman he knows that might have answers for what possesses Ward — or rather, a potential Inhuman. He lives in South Dakota and is kind of a rebel who used to be at Afterlife but broke into Jiaying’s office raving about an ancient power that can bring people back from the dead.

NEXT: Talk less, smile more

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