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Entertainment Weekly

Music

15 things you'll find in Taylor Swift's reputation magazines

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No matter how you feel about Taylor Swift as a person or an artist, most of us can agree on at least one thing: She knows how to monetize her content like nobody else. The latest proof of that is Swift’s two magazines in the special editions of her new album reputation, available exclusively at Target for $19.99 each. We went to Target today and bought both copies — and here’s what you can find inside.

1. Volume 1 and Volume 2 each contain a physical CD of reputation the album — which is a bit strange when you consider that most of Swift’s loyal fans will probably want both issues.

2. Both issues share the same introductory note in which Swift reflects on reputations and how different people in your life see you in different ways.

3. But each issue has a different poem on the back flap. Volume 1‘s is called “Why She Disappeared” and seems to chart Swift’s “fall” from grace. The best line: “When she turned to go home/She heard the echoes of new words/’May your heart remain breakable/But never by the same hand twice.'”

4. Volume 2‘s poem is “If You’re Anything Like Me,” a piece about confronting the past, growing up, and finding yourself. The best line is: “And no amount of friends at 25/Will fill the empty seats/At the lunch tables of your past/The teams that picked you last… /But Darling you keep trying.”

5. There are instructions on how to fold your own CD case, but she could have saved some ink by just writing “fold this in half and tear off the bottom piece of paper.”

6. The excess paper becomes a “keepsake bookmark.” Thanks, Tay Tay!

7. Photos fill both magazines — both personal Polaroids and professional shots. Swift has decorated some of the Polaroids, either scrawling lyrics on the borders with a marker (á la 1989) or painting directly onto the photo. One of them looks like she held a lighter to it and let part of it melt.

8. Other photos show Swift on vacation somewhere tropical, or walking alone (aside from whoever took the photo) in the woods. They definitely add to the “Nobody’s heard from me for months… I’m better than I ever was” vibe she’s trying to put out with this album.

9. The best photo shows Swift posing like the Disaster Girl meme, turning back and smiling in front of a fire.

10. Yes, there are full-page photos of her cats, Meredith and Olivia.

11. Handwritten lyrics from all of reputation’s tracks stretch across both Volume 1 and Volume 2 — half are in one, half are in the other. (So, again, she must expect fans to buy both copies. SO WHY TWO ALBUMS?)

12. The lyric pages are pretty straightforward aside from a couple funny instances where she credits herself as “Taylor Swift AKA Nils Sjöberg” or “Shifty Swifty.” (You might remember that the former is the pseudonym Swift used in the songwriting credits for “This Is What You Came For,” ex-boyfriend Calvin Harris’ song with Rihanna.)

13. We now know that the kid who speaks on “Gorgeous” is Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds’ eldest daughter, James, but Swift confirms it again on the page, writing, “Tiny baby James Reynolds, little cherubic mischievous scene stealer from Heaven: ‘Gorgeous!'”

14. Both issues contain behind-the-scenes trivia about the “Look What You Made Me Do” video. Some of it is interesting (for example: a sequined blanket and thousands of plastic stones were used to create the look of the diamond-filled bathtub she sat in). Some of it is not (like this: “Taylor’s music video director and long-term collaborator Joseph Kahn returns for their most ambitious project to date.” We already knew this from Twitter, but thank you.)

15. Finally, both issues have the same painting on the front flap and the back flap — the one on the front is a landscape of a stormy sea, and the one on the back looks like a tranquil oceanside sunrise.

Both issues of reputation are available now at Target.

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