Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images
Maria Pasquini
December 16, 2017 at 08:15 PM EST

Rose McGowan is not a fan of the news that many major actresses are planning on wearing black to the Golden Globes as a symbol of protest against harassment in Hollywood.

On Saturday, McGowan, 44, spoke out against the “silent protest” and women who were supposedly taking part who had worked with disgraced producer Harvey Weinstein in the past — calling out Meryl Streep in particular.

“Actresses, like Meryl Streep, who happily worked for The Pig Monster, are wearing black @GoldenGlobes in a silent protest,” she wrote on Twitter, referring to Weinstein.

“YOUR SILENCE is THE problem,” McGowan continued. “You’ll accept a fake award breathlessly & affect no real change. I despise your hypocrisy. Maybe you should all wear Marchesa,” she added, referencing Weinstein’s estranged wife Georgina Chapman’s fashion line.

It has not been confirmed if Streep — who received a Globes nomination for her role in The Post — will be among the major actresses wearing black.

When asked by Extra about whether she would be taking part in the protest at the Golden Globes, the 68-year-old actress said, “I don’t know. I’m not talking. You gotta tune in, don’t ya?”

 In October, Streep became one of the first actresses to speak out against the disgraced producer.

“The disgraceful news about Harvey Weinstein has appalled those of us whose work he championed, and those whose good and worthy causes he supported,” said Streep in a statement. “The intrepid women who raised their voices to expose this abuse are our heroes.”

“One thing can be clarified. Not everybody knew. Harvey supported the work fiercely, was exasperating but respectful with me in our working relationship, and with many others with whom he worked professionally,” she added. “I didn’t know about these other offenses: I did not know about his financial settlements with actresses and colleagues; I did not know about his having meetings in his hotel room, his bathroom, or other inappropriate, coercive acts.”

“The behavior is inexcusable, but the abuse of power familiar,” she continued. “Each brave voice that is raised, heard and credited by our watchdog media will ultimately change the game.”

Over 50 women have accused Weinstein, 65, of sexual assault and misconduct since The New York Times and The New Yorker documented decades of alleged sexual misconduct and sexual assault involving a number of women in detailed articles in October. McGowan was one of the first women to come forward — accusing the producer of rape.

In a statement to PEOPLE, Weinstein’s attorneys have denied any allegations of sexual assault.

“Mr. Weinstein has never at any time committed an act of sexual assault, and it is wrong and irresponsible to conflate claims of impolitic behavior or consensual sexual contact later regretted, with an untrue claim of criminal conduct,” his lawyers said. “There is a wide canyon between mere allegation and truth, and we are confident that any sober calculation of the facts will prove no legal wrongdoing occurred.

“Nonetheless, to those offended by Mr. Weinstein’s behavior, he remains deeply apologetic.”

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