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Jojo Moyes' 'Me Before You': Top Kindle highlights

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Me Before You, the film adaptation of Jojo Moyes’ 2012 tearjerker, finally opens Friday, June 3. But before you (and your seven boxes of Kleenex) head to the theater, refresh your memory about the book.

Below, check out the most popular Kindle highlights from Me Before You, courtesy of Amazon.

  • “You only get one life. It’s actually your duty to live it as fully as possible.”
  • “The thing about being catapulted into a whole new life—or at least, shoved up so hard against someone else’s life that you might as well have your face pressed against their window—is that it forces you to rethink your idea of who you are. Or how you might seem to other people.”
  • “It’s just that the thing you never understand about being a mother, until you are one, is that it is not the grown man—the galumphing, unshaven, stinking, opinionated offspring—you see before you, with his parking tickets and unpolished shoes and complicated love life. You see all the people he has ever been all rolled up into one.”
  • “I worked out what would make me happy, and I worked out what I wanted to do, and I trained myself to do the job that would make those two things happen.”, 
  • “Some mistakes…just have greater consequences than others. But you don’t have to let that night be the thing that defines you.”
  • “I just…want to be a man who has been to a concert with a girl in a red dress. Just for a few minutes more.” 
  • “I hadn’t realized that music could unlock things in you, could transport you to somewhere even the composer hadn’t predicted. It left an imprint in the air around you, as if you carried its remnants with you when you went.”
  • “They say you only really appreciate a garden once you reach a certain age, and I suppose there is a truth in that. It’s probably something to do with the great circle of life. There seems to be something miraculous about seeing the relentless optimism of new growth after the bleakness of winter, a kind of joy in the difference every year, the way nature chooses to show off different parts of the garden to its full advantage.” 
  • “That’s what he was asking me to extinguish—the small child as well as the man—all that love, all that history.” 
  • “I needed to tell him, silently, that things might change, grow, or fail, but that life did go on. That we were all part of some great cycle, some pattern that it was only God’s purpose to understand.”

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