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Lilly Singh talks A Trip to Unicorn Island, YouTube Red: Interview

The documentary premieres on YouTube Red Wednesday

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Paul Zimmerman/WireImage

YouTube has officially joined the ranks of Netflix, Hulu, Amazon, and the many streaming platforms that provide original content with a paid subscription. YouTube Red shared its first round of original programming Wednesday from top creators such as PewDiePie, Lilly Singh, Meg DeAngelis, Jake Paul, and the Rooster Teeth team. Their original content will live on creators’ pages alongside free videos available to members and nonmembers alike, and will be available for streaming on YouTube’s site and app.

Singh — whose documentary A Trip to Unicorn Island debuts on YouTube Red Wednesday — says she believes her fans will pay the $9.99 monthly fee for the premium content, and promises her new ventures will not detract from her normal weekly posting schedule. And while the self-proclaimed “superwoman” felt she had options when deciding where to release the movie, Singh partnered with YouTube because of her and her fans’ loyalty to the platform.

“Ultimately I went with YouTube Red because I wanted the most amount of my audience to see this movie, that was what was most important to me,” 27-year-old Singh tells EW. “YouTube is a terrific platform they’re very comfortable with.”

A Trip to Unicorn Island references Singh’s happy place, the destination she tries to find in her videos and attempts to guide her fans to as well. The documentary follows the Canada native on a 26-city tour around the world and offers fans a never-before-seen look at the YouTube star.

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“The film, because it’s not shot by me, you see sides of me that you’ve never seen on the Internet before,” Singh admits. “It’s very raw and very genuine in terms of my emotions and the roller coaster I go on.”

And not filming it herself was the hardest part for Singh.

“I had a group that followed me around almost every show I did around the world and I had to let up a lot of my control to let someone else shoot it instead of me,” she says. “It made me feel more comfortable to do things like this where I don’t have to play all the roles in the production.”

But Singh isn’t quite ready to hand over the production reins just yet. “It opens doors for a lot of things,” she says of giving up that control. “Stress, anxiety, but yes, creativity as well.”