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Sara Bareilles Sounds Like Me: 9 things we learned about the singer

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Christopher Polk/Getty Images

In her new book Sounds Like Me: My Life (So Far) in Song, Sara Bareilles reveals stories behind some of her best-known tracks. The set of eight essays takes readers through her childhood weight struggle, her year studying abroad in Italy, and her early days trying to make it as a singer/songwriter. Bareilles shares pictures from her younger years, hand written lyrics, and personal journal entries, along with shoutouts to famous pals like Ben Folds — who pens the forward — college friends Maroon 5, and Jack Antonoff. Here’s what Sounds Like Me , out today, singer taught us about Bareilles.

Ben Folds used Little Voice to prop up an uneven leg on his entertainment center.

In a foreword from the Ben Folds Five frontman, he admits to using a promotional copy of Bareilles’ debut album as a quick furniture fix before purchasing it and playing it to death.

Bareilles wrote one of her first songs in her backyard in Eureka, CA.

And it was called “My Special Place”.

The singer considers horse people superheroes.

“They were true horse people: they owner enormous tucks with extra wheels, went trail riding on weekends and wore cowboy hats unironically. They were freaking superheroes.”

The youngest of three girls, Bareilles calls her older sister Stacey her musical inspiration.

They wrote a song together called “I Love a Parade” when Bareilles was five or six, making Stacey her first collaborator.

About that high note in “Gravity”

“It’s really not that high in my range,” Bareilles writes. “(It looks harder than it actually is.)”

She sets the record straight on where “Love Song” came from.

It’s not exactly as simple as Bareilles ignoring her record company’s request to write a romantic ballad, as rumor has it. The hit came out of a long period during which the singer tested out writing with various collaborators who didn’t share her vision. Scared she lost her connection with songwriting, Bareilles turned the frustrating experience into “Love Song,” which she wasn’t even sure her label would like. “I was certain it would get lumped into the bevy of discarded songs, but I didn’t care.” Bareilles writes. “I felt creatively energized.”

The song that made her a household name only took 30 minutes to write. 

Yup, Bareilles cranked out “Love Song” in about a half hour.

Bareilles has a “pop-reggae tune about making out”

But she’s going to “leave that in the vault for another time.”

She practiced in a storage space in L.A. for two years…

Until Public Storage found out about the arrangement and shut her down.