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Mia Farrow criticized for tweeting business address of Cecil the lion's killer

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Mark Sagliocco/Getty Images

Mia Farrow has never been afraid to tweet her mind — no matter the topic — and when news spread that Dr. Walter Palmer, a Minnesota dentist, had paid $55,000 to kill beloved Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe, she did just that. 

But some people thought she took matters too far when, according to The Associated Press, she shared Palmer’s business address on the site. She later deleted the tweet, but people still took notice:

Farrow was hardly the first person to share the address. Twitter’s policies prohibit users from posting any addresses that “are considered or treated as private,” but there’s a catch: “If information was previously posted or displayed elsewhere on the Internet prior to being put on Twitter, it may not be a violation of this policy.”

According to the AP, a “couple of hundred people” have already gathered in front of the office to protest. 

In a letter posted online on Wednesday, Palmer wrote, “I deeply regret that my pursuit of an activity I love and practice responsibly and legally resulted in the taking of this lion.” 

“In early July, I was in Zimbabwe on a bow hunting trip for big game. I hired several professional guides and they secured all proper permits. To my knowledge, everything about this trip was legal and properly handled and conducted,” he wrote. “I had no idea that the lion I took was a known, local favorite, was collared and part of a study until the end of the hunt. I relied on the expertise of my local professional guides to ensure a legal hunt. I have not been contacted by authorities in Zimbabwe or in the U.S. about this situation, but will assist them in any inquiries they may have.”

Representatives for Twitter and Farrow did not immediately respond to EW’s request for comment.

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