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On the Books: Bill & Hillary's legacy gets investigated

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Coloring books have become the latest trend in adult stress relief, and artist Lydia Hess is adding to it. Hess has signed a deal with HarperElixir to create two new coloring books “for the soul” titled Sacred Nature and Sacred Symbols. The spiritually-focused books will each feature 50 illustrations and will be available Oct. 6. (GalleyCat)

Google just made its e-books even better with a new default typeface called Literata. A tweet from Google Play says the font is “perfect for long reads on all devices.” Literata has been in the works since April 2014 as a collaboration between Google and TypeTogether. It is available in Google Books version 3.4.5. (The Next Web)

North Carolina teacher Omar Currie read a gay fairytale titled King & King in class following an incident where a student accused another student of being gay, suggesting it to be derogatory. His attempt to teach his students a life lesson sparked complaints from parents, resulting in a committee meeting to address the issue. It was decided that Currie was allowed to teach the book, but a policy was put in place that requires “teachers to notify parents of all the books they plan to read in class and to fill out a form for every bullying incident.” The News & Observer goes into more detail about this debate. (The News & Observer)

HarperCollins imprint Ecco announced Tuesday that MSNBC host Steve Kornacki is writing a book discussing how “the politics of the past shape the present,” according to ABC News. The book will take a “definitive look” at the 1990s legacy as well as the “turmoil” of Bill Clinton’s presidency and the effect on Hillary Rodham Clinton’s current candidacy for the Oval Office. Currently untitled, the book is scheduled to be published in 2017. (ABC News)

Media distributor Midwest Tape just rolled out a new e-book service through hoopla, its on-demand Internet streaming service. Thousands of titles—including comics—from indie publishers are now available on hoopla on a multi-user basis, which sets it apart from the multitudes of one-copy/one user models in the market. (Publisher’s Weekly)

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