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'Grey's Anatomy' poll: Did Derek get a proper send-off?

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Kelsey McNeal/ABC

Spoiler alert: If you haven’t watched the April 23 episode of Grey’s Anatomy—and have somehow avoided all social media—you should really stop reading now. 

So last night, Grey’s Anatomy said goodbye to Derek in a rather crappy way, if you ask me. Here’s how it went down: After witnessing a car accident and stopping to save everyone involved (in his typical McDreamy way), Derek got back in his car to drive off. But when his phone buzzed, he stopped… while parked PERPENDICULAR to the road. And after hours of zero cars passing, a tractor trailer showed up and t-boned him out of the blue.

But Derek didn’t die on impact. Instead, he was sent to some hospital we’ve never heard of, where the doctors aren’t trained for trauma. Via his inner monologue, Derek begged them to check his head. And when they didn’t, he realized that he was going to die because the doctors weren’t as good as the ones at his own hospital. 

To top it off, by the time his awful doctors realized that he needed a neurosurgeon, the neurosurgeon didn’t want to leave his dinner—so he took an hour and a half to get to the hospital. (As Zola had said earlier: People die when doctors are late.) 

By then, Derek was brain dead, and Meredith was forced to unplug him. 

So after just about everyone on this show has almost died and then been saved by their friends at Grey Sloan Memorial, Derek was rushed to some crappy place we’ve never heard of to die because of incompetence. At least if he’d gone to Grey Sloan, we would’ve known that they’d done everything they could’ve. Also, he would’ve died among friends. 

Yes, the storyline of Derek being another doctor’s motivation—of teaching her a lesson—was fitting for the show. But that’s a storyline that you reserve for a recurring guest star that we’ve grown to love. This is not how you have McDreamy bow out—lying in a bed, knowing how to save himself but unable to communicate that to his doctors. 

Of all the ways he could’ve gone—dying while saving that family in a shocking but heroic moment, or dying at Grey Sloan and getting a chance to say goodbye to everyone—this felt cheap. And quite frankly, it felt a little rude to the man himself. He was called McDreamy for a reason, and he deserved better than this.

Do you agree?

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