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'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt' is 'not why' celebrity dermatologist Fredric Brandt committed suicide, says source

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UPDATE: Though Dr. Frederic Brandt was skewered on Tina Fey and Robert Carlock’s new Netflix series Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, a source tells People that the parody did not prompt his apparent suicide. “He was depressed,” the source said. “Did the show upset him? Yes. It was a mean characterization. He was a human being, no one would like that. It was making fun of him for the way he looked and it was mean and it was bullying. It was an illness, he suffered from depression… It wasn’t the only thing troubling him, it was just one factor. It definitely hurt him. He was absolutely upset, who would want that? But that was not why he committed suicide. But it didn’t help.” 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Fredric Brandt, a dermatologist whose famous clients included Madonna, has died. He was 65.

Brandt opened his own dermatology practice in Miami in 1982, and soon became known for his use of injectables—Botox included—to rejuvenate skin. He went on to open another practice in New York and launched a skincare line in 2001.

“I want people to feel they haven’t given up on life and are still in the game,” Brandt told The New York Times in 2014. “The realistic thing is to look refreshed and happy, not sad, not fatigued.”

Some of Brandt’s expertise was gained from experimenting on himself. “I’ve been kind of a pioneer in pushing the limits to see how things work and what the look would be,” he told the Times. “Would I change anything I’ve done? I might not have used as much Botox, because you don’t want to look quite as frozen.”

He wasn’t just known for his love of Botox, however. “He cared about his patients very deeply,” Vogue’s beauty director Sarah Brown said in a statement to Brandt’s publicist. “Not only how they looked, but how they felt. He understood the powerful role his work could play in enhancing a person’s self-confidence, and I think he took great pleasure from that gift.”