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Sequel to Stieg Larsson's Millennium series gets title and cover

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It’s been over a decade since Swedish writer Stieg Larsson (The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played With Fire, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest) died, but his Millennium series lives on. Larsson’s British publisher has just announced the title of the next book in the series: The Girl in the Spider’s Web.

The upcoming sequel was written by David Lagercrantz, The Guardian reports, under extensive levels of security: “Lagercrantz wrote the work on a computer with no internet connection, and delivered the Swedish manuscript to his publishers by hand.” In Swedish, the book’s title (Det som inte dödar oss) translates to What Doesn’t Kill You. George Goulding is helming the English translation.

As UK publisher Christopher MacLehose told The Guardian, Larsson’s estate has given Lagercrantz “a completely free rein” to continue the stories. “The reader of this fourth book will know exactly who they are. It will be like coming home, getting back into a hot bath you wished you hadn’t left on a winter’s day—here we are, thrilled to be chained once more to the same calibre of narrator. Lagercrantz is very, very clever.”

Joakim and Erland Larsson, the late writer’s father and brother, said in a statement: “We chose David Lagercrantz because we think he is highly suited to the task. David is a skilled writer who has portrayed odd characters and complex geniuses throughout his career. He will be doing it his own way.”

Not everyone from Larsson’s life is on board with the sequel, however. Eva Gabrielsson, his partner of 32 years, has spoken constantly of her opposition to continuing the series. Gabrielsson has said that she has 200 pages of Larsson’s draft of the fourth book, but they will never be published. Because the pair never married, Larsson’s estate was divided between his father and brother.

In a recent interview with AFP in Stockholm, she said: “I wouldn’t have continued Stieg’s work. It was his language, his unique narrative…. The worst thing is how saddened Stieg would have been. He never let anyone work on his literary texts. He would have been furious. Who knows, maybe he’ll send a lightning bolt at the book launch.”

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