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Madonna hacker indicted in Israel

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Diplo? Nicki Minaj? Count them in. And if her Instagram hashtags are any indication, look for a track called #TrustNoBitch. But there's one bitch Madge…
Kevin Mazur/WireImage

Five weeks after his arrest, Adi Lederman—the 39-year-old Israeli man who was originally arrested under suspicion of hacking Madonna’s computer and leaking her unfinished music—was formally indicted by Israel’s magistrate courts on four counts: computer trespassing, copyright Infringement, prohibited secret monitoring and additional computer trespassing, and obstructing investigation.

The first count, computer trespassing, refers to Lederman hacking into the private soundcloud accounts of three individuals (her associate Sara Zambrano, sound engineer Angie Teo, and musical director Kevin Antunes) who were sharing Madonna’s copywrited material, as well as an additional 15 unrelated accounts. The second count, according to the Hollywood Reporter, intimates that Lederman had hold of more than just Rebel Heart, apparently also accessing the star’s previous album, MDNA, in 2012. The final count refers to Lederman’s attempt to have all correspondence regarding the potential case and alleged crime deleted by his cohort “Craig Lunti.” 

27 demos intended for Madonna’s 13th album found their way online last December. Lederman made only “tens of dollars to a thousand dollars” for what he stole from the various accounts, which included Madonna’s 2015 Grammy rehearsal audio.

Madonna responded by releasing 6 tracks early, calling the leak “a form of terrorism” that was “equivalent to ‘artistic rape.'” After Lederman’s initial arrest, Madonna released the following statement: “I am profoundly grateful to the FBI, the Israeli Police investigators and anyone else who helped lead to the arrest of this hacker. I deeply appreciate my fans who have provided us with pertinent information and continue to do so regarding leaks of my music. Like any citizen, I have the right to privacy. This invasion into my life creatively, professionally, and personally remains a deeply devastating and hurtful experience, as it must be for all artists who are victims of this type of crime.”

 

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