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Tom Brosseau digs up rare film scores for an exclusive playlist

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TOM BROSSEAU
Carey Braswell

EW‘s a big fan of Tom Brosseau and his elegantly crafted, John Parish-produced LP Perfect Abandon. And Tom Brosseau is a big fan of film scores. He loves them so much, in fact, that he’s done some thorough digging to come up with a bunch of rare film scores–many of them out of print–for a playlist. The films they come from are all over the place, from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off to the 1997 Oliver Stone thriller U-Turn, but there’s a balance between rootsiness and ethereality that bind the musical selections together.

Here’s a short essay from Brosseau on his selections:

Most of these soundtracks have gone out-of-print. Probably little chance they’ll come back in print. If you should decide to hunt for a physical copy of any listed below, vinyl or cassette may be your only options. The Internet will otherwise accommodate your search.

Some of these soundtracks never were in print. Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, for example. Only a limited run of a 7″ pressing of two songs from the film for the John Hughes fan club. The score to the motion picture Never Cry Wolf is available as part of a compilation that highlights some of composer Mark Isham’s work, Film Music. But warning: The Never Cry Wolf selection of the compilation is a 24-minute track. It might be asking a lot to sift through this for the true theme of Never Cry Wolf. While the score is great, every minute of it, if you decide to order the album I’ll just tell you. Jog to the 18-minute marker.

One dilemma I have come up against, being a lover of film music, and maybe some of you will attest, is the sometimes incongruity of the music in the film and the music that comprises the soundtrack. For instance, the ending scene in the motion picture Never Cry Wolf features either a different mix of the bassoon or an alternate take altogether. In the film the bassoon is prominently featured. On the soundtrack not so much. While I can understand and appreciate the choices that need to be executed in order to produce a motion picture, it is frustrating. I love the bassoon. I’ll want to relive that particular moment from the film but listening to the soundtrack only gets me lost. Some film music truly only exists in film.

Here’s some of my favorite selections from some of my favorite films. I realize this list may come across as obscure. I assure you my mission is to share music that has touched me, not be clever, not send you on a wild goose chase. But enjoy the little hunt just the same. I am confident you will discover something new, something great, something lasting.

Yours truly,

Tom Brosseau

25 November 14

Los Angeles, Calif.

1) “End Scene” from the motion picture Never Cry Wolf composed by Mark Isham, featuring Olivier Rufus on bassoon

2) “Perdition” from the motion picture Road To Perdition composed by Thomas Newman, performed by Paul Newman and Tom Hanks

3) “Pennies From Heaven” from the motion picture Pennies From Heaven, written by Arthur Johnston and Johnny Burke, performed by Steve Martin

4) “Or Was I” from the motion picture Even Cowgirls Get The Blues composed by k.d. lang and Ben Mink

5) “U Turn” from the motion picture U Turn composed by Ennio Morricone

6) “Please Please Please Let Me Get What I Want” from the motion picture Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, written by Johnny Marr and Steven Patrick Morrissey, performed by Dream Academy 

7) “Big Fran’s Baby” from the motion picture A Perfect World composed by Lennie Niehaus

8) “Define Love” from the motion picture Starman composed by Jack Nitzsche

9) “I Love to Tell the Story” from the motion picture The Apostle, written by Arabella Katherine Hankey and William G. Fischer, performed by Robert Duvall and Emmylou Harris

10) “Hand in Hand” from the motion picture Heat composed by Elliot Goldenthal

 

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