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Syfy to adapt '2001' sequel into miniseries

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2001-04

Syfy’s push to re-conquer outer space with serious drama programming continues: The cable channel is going to adapt Arthur C. Clarke’s novel 3001: The Final Odyssey into a miniseries with Ridley Scott (Blade Runner) on board as executive producer.

The project will bring the never-before-produced final chapter of the legendary sci-fi book and film 2001: A Space Odyssey to basic cable. Stuart Beattie (Pirates of the Caribbean, Collateral) will write the adaptation and serve as an executive producer.

Official logline: “An epic story of a man lost in time, Arthur C. Clarke’s final Odyssey book resolves the tale that was begun in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Beginning with the discovery of Frank Poole’s frozen body, floating in space, 3001: The Final Odyssey offers an extraordinary range of complex characters with conflicting agendas, stunning visuals, and dark thematic meditations on the final fate of all Humankind.”

Syfy released in a statement that the estates of both famed 2001 director Stanley Kubrick and Clarke have offered their full support for the project. “I have always been a fan of Clarke’s extraordinary Odyssey series, and certainly Kubrick’s adaptation of 2001,” Scott added in a statement. “I am thrilled to be part of bringing that legacy to audiences and continuing the great cinematic tradition that this story and its creators deserve.”

“Arthur C. Clarke is the father of modern science fiction,” said Syfy President Dave Howe. “We couldn’t be more excited to be working with Scott Free and Warner Horizon Television to bring to the screen, for the very first time, the final chapter of this extraordinary masterpiece.”

Syfy is also making another of Clarke’s novels into a miniseries, Childhood’s End. Back in 2000, it was reported MGM and Tom Hanks were in discussions to turn Clarke’s 2061: Odyssey Three and 3001: The Final Odyssey into movies, but the projects never got off the ground.

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