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Feedback: September 19/26, 2014

Your reactions to our ”Walking Dead” coverage, appreciation for the under-appreciated ”Edge of Tomorrow”, and more

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Season’s Eatings
I am so excited about the return of The Walking Dead, and your extensive coverage was just what I needed to keep me hanging on. I’ve watched TWD from the beginning — without the benefit of the comics — and have enjoyed every episode. With all the beautiful people on TV, this is one series where I look forward to seeing just how grungy these characters can get!
Sandi Pravecek
Denver

After reading about how the Walking Dead actors wanted their characters to go out, I asked myself, ”Where’s Chandler Riggs, who plays Carl?” There is no mention of him at all — by anybody! Is that perhaps the biggest spoiler of them all?
Kim Shaw
Bayonne, N.J.

Editor at large Dalton Ross responds… Hmmm, was Carl not mentioned because something horrible happens to him in the first five minutes of the season premiere and we didn’t want to ruin it… or was he just too busy eating pudding to talk to EW? That’s our secret — for now.

Big-Screen Marvels
In the movie category of ”Summer Winners & Losers” (News and Notes), one surprise omission was among the year’s biggest winners: Marvel Comics films. Whether the movies featured mechanical-armed assassins (Captain America: The Winter Soldier), webslingers (The Amazing Spider-Man 2), or Sentinels and speed demons (X-Men: Days of Future Past), Marvel has had one great year. In fact, 2014 is probably the only year you can say the summer was stolen by a motormouthed raccoon. Rock on, Rocket!
Tom Carter
Covington, La.

You call Edge of Tomorrow one of the movie losers. Are box office receipts the only factor when determining whether something is a winner or loser? I realize EoT may not have had the type of box office reception enjoyed by the typical Marvel movie, but it was a damn good film. It had a lot more to say than a CGI-fest about a bunch of crime-fighting turtles. If there’s any justice in this pop culture world, Edge of Tomorrow will end up on more than one critic’s year-end top 10 list.
Kevin Watkin
Drexel Hill, Pa.

Revisiting the Classics
EW always has great content, but little bonuses like the look back at Out of the Past (Movies), a longtime fave, and the detailed John Cassavetes piece (Binge!) make for must-reads filled with nice surprises. Okay, gotta go rewatch Jane Greer give Bob Mitchum all he can handle.
Louis B. Parks
Wimberley, Tex.

Play Something Country
Based on your Fall Music Guide, 99 percent of country-music stars seem to be taking the fall off from releasing new albums and going on tour. Guess they needed a rest after selling millions of records and selling out all of their shows… Come on, guys, share the wealth! A lot of us EW readers are actually country-music fans.
Keith A. Meeks
Newport News, Va.

Bacall: An Appreciation
Readers decried the lack of print coverage on Lauren Bacall, who died on Aug. 12 at age 89. The actress’ passing fell between our publication cycles, but here’s a sliver of Chris Nashawaty’s EW.com essay on her torrid film debut opposite Humphrey Bogart in To Have and Have Not. (You’ll also find a gallery of her unforgettable roles, a video tribute, and more online.)

”Just put your lips together and…blow.” As the words come out of her mouth, every man and woman in the audience is leaning forward in their seats, thinking the same exact thing: Who is this woman? It is 1944. She is 19 years old. And with that one indelible scene of serve-and-volley flirtation, her life is about to change forever. She will not only become a movie star from this moment forward, her kiss will force the biggest big-screen icon of his era to leave his wife and ask her to marry him despite their 25-year age difference…. You could say that the history of movies is composed of moments like this one. A string of unscripted, stolen moments sealed with a kiss. And yet, we rarely believe them. We rarely lose ourselves in them and forget we’re watching actors pretending. There is nothing make-believe about the moment when Bacall met Bogie in To Have and Have Not. And yet, it’s pure celluloid magic sprinkled in fairy dust. It’s for the ages. It’s a snapshot of two actors not acting. They are just living in the moment, falling in love in front of our very eyes. How lucky we were — and are — to be able to witness something as miraculous and timeless as that.

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